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Here is the other photo that goes with my previous picture showing a freight truck being maintained. This slide was somewhat more underexposed so please forgive its looking a little strained. It is the subject that has me scratching my head. I have never seen wheelsets being kept in a box car, their typical residence is on a flat car. Nice that my Dad snapped it as it travels the ramps. 2 big hooks on the axel with some kind of winch inside to bring the wheels in or out. The box car that my Dad was working on in the other photo is the car to the right in this picture, with a big orange car jack holding it up. Just above the jack you can see the BLT date of this car which appears to be 11 18. So, why keep wheels in a box car? The journal ends can be wrapped and greased to protect them from the weather.
Thanks to those of you that came to have a look at these pictures.  :^)
Copyright Notice: This image ©S. Priest all rights reserved.



Caption: Here is the other photo that goes with my previous picture showing a freight truck being maintained. This slide was somewhat more underexposed so please forgive its looking a little strained. It is the subject that has me scratching my head. I have never seen wheelsets being kept in a box car, their typical residence is on a flat car. Nice that my Dad snapped it as it travels the ramps. 2 big hooks on the axel with some kind of winch inside to bring the wheels in or out. The box car that my Dad was working on in the other photo is the car to the right in this picture, with a big orange car jack holding it up. Just above the jack you can see the BLT date of this car which appears to be 11 18. So, why keep wheels in a box car? The journal ends can be wrapped and greased to protect them from the weather. Thanks to those of you that came to have a look at these pictures. :^)

Photographer:
S. Priest [80] (more) (contact)
Date: Late 1950's (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: Nil (search)
Train Symbol: Nil (search)
Subdivision/SNS: City Yard (search)
City/Town: Edmonton (search)
Province: Alberta (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=29569
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5 Comments
  1. Those are great Paul. This is a side of railroading that I never became to familiar with. My Dad, when he talked about work, mainly related stories about working with passenger equipment. Thanks for your picture links, I really enjoy this other side of trains.

  2. Another OCS car…
    http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=24595

  3. Here’s another view of a slightly more modern Road Repair Car on CN’s Great Lakes Region at Oba, ON that I posted a while back.
    http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=24594
    ‘Back-in-the-day’ there was quite a variety of OCS equipment in the CN fleet used for on-line servicing of plant and equipment.
    I recall Road Repair Cars from the Mechanical Dept., Diesel Maintainer Cars from Motive Power, Generator Maintainer Cars from Signals & Communications, Field Maintainer Cars from Work Equipment, and so on. Most of these specially built cars were live in one end and work in the other.

  4. Thanks for that First954. My thinking if you’re in the Edmonton terminal is why not just send it to the car repair shop. But if a truck is in a bad way, for whatever reason, moving it for repair makes less sense than just spotting the road repair car, as in this case and fix her right where the car sits. Gotcha now ;-)

  5. The box car where the wheel set is either coming from or going to, is a Road Repair Car. Note the non-revenue car number of 52867. This type of car was a rolling repair shop that carried everything, including wheel sets, necessary so that cars could be repaired anywhere out on the road. This type of car also included sleeping space for its crew.

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