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Early dawn begins to hit the nose of CN 2341 as it idles away just short of the Port Robinson West interlocking with CN 422. At the head end, 331's death bed lies in the consist (loaded Vinyl Chloride tankers). From past experiences at Port Robinson, including many very early morning trips go out of Port Robinson Yard and almost half way to Thorold Stone Road was quite common. I never bothered to stay out past 6am though as yard operations died until around 9am when Port Robinson became a barrage of granny drivers that like to drive 20 below the limit. I've even been screamed at multiple times to slow down in the downtown area while driving the speed limit (both were people standing almost in the middle of the road). As of very recently though, CN 422 has left Port Robinson shortly after 0600 on several occasions, where as before a 0900 departure was the earliest you'd see. This new scheduled time or whatever it may be is good for me as I don't have to deal with the slow knuckleheads in the area who frequently tap their brakes for invisible cars, or the crazy locals standing in the middle of the road screaming at me. However, another advantage appears to be the lighting, which was quite mellow yet not the drabby overcast kind of mellow. The sky made short work of that as it was completely overcast only a few minutes later. 

422 would throttle up about a half hour after I left. As it had consistently been so recently, 422 was about 11000 feet, however dozens of 89 foot autoracks, 89 foot flat cars and 86 autoparts cars meant only 140 cars were needed to make up that length.

As for this particular interlocking, like many others on the Stamford Sub, it is a wye which leads to other subdivisions. The track to the right goes to the CN Thorold Spur. This wye is mostly utilized at night it seems. Oh, and the Geep yard power that used to be at Port Rob, I haven't seen them in months. All the six axle units have been doing all the switch grinding work it seems. The rails in the foreground show relatively clear signs of what appears to be wheel slip. Well, considering this is a takeoff point for 150 car behemoths, I guess that's not a surprise.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Daniel Odette all rights reserved.



Caption: Early dawn begins to hit the nose of CN 2341 as it idles away just short of the Port Robinson West interlocking with CN 422. At the head end, 331's death bed lies in the consist (empty Vinyl Chloride tankers). From past experiences at Port Robinson, including many very early morning trips go out of Port Robinson Yard and almost half way to Thorold Stone Road was quite common. I never bothered to stay out past 6am though as yard operations died until around 9am when Port Robinson became a barrage of granny drivers that like to drive 20 below the limit. I've even been screamed at multiple times to slow down in the downtown area while driving the speed limit (both were people standing almost in the middle of the road). As of very recently though, CN 422 has left Port Robinson shortly after 0600 on several occasions, where as before a 0900 departure was the earliest you'd see. This new scheduled time or whatever it may be is good for me as I don't have to deal with the slow knuckleheads in the area who frequently tap their brakes for invisible cars, or the crazy locals standing in the middle of the road screaming at me. However, another advantage appears to be the lighting, which was quite mellow yet not the drabby overcast kind of mellow. The sky made short work of that as it was completely overcast only a few minutes later.

422 would throttle up about a half hour after I left. As it had consistently been so recently, 422 was about 11000 feet, however dozens of 89 foot autoracks, 89 foot flat cars and 86 autoparts cars meant only 140 cars were needed to make up that length.

As for this particular interlocking, like many others on the Stamford Sub, it is a wye which leads to other subdivisions. The track to the right goes to the CN Thorold Spur. This wye is mostly utilized at night it seems. Oh, and the Geep yard power that used to be at Port Rob, I haven't seen them in months. All the six axle units have been doing all the switch grinding work it seems. The rails in the foreground show relatively clear signs of what appears to be wheel slip. Well, considering this is a takeoff point for 150 car behemoths, I guess that's not a surprise.

Photographer:
Daniel Odette [129] (more) (contact)
Date: 05/15/2016 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: CN 2341 (search)
Train Symbol: CN A42231 15 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Mile 24.0 CN Stamford Subdivision - Port Robinson West (search)
City/Town: Allanburg (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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5 Comments
  1. Lol, I do speed, but not in town.

    Well I’m liking the new times for 422! Never been an early bird, but its been working in my favour so far. I have seen both 523 and 524 recently, and whoever was at the helm on both trains wasn’t wasting any time. There’s a mud patch between the rails on the north track just to the left of the station doors at St. Catharines, and I have literally been able to make the track wobble up and down with my feet. When 524 ripped over it, it was thrashing pretty violently, and I was seriously questioning if I was going to make it off the platform in one piece. I’ll have to remind myself to not stand behind the station wall next time so I can run out of the way if something goes wrong. Lol.

  2. LOL@ AW :-)

    I know where you are standing Daniel. Yes when we lift a train from Pt Rob West its all uphill for a little while. As for 422, well the crew normally goes on duty between 6 and 8 most days..6:15 is the norm and some days the train just bypasses Aldershot and head to Mac Yrd. They have been running lots of 524′s from Pt. Rob. Most just run to Aldershot like last nights 524. Others go right to Mac Yrd. Always a guessing game.

  3. Saw 422 not too long ago right before 10 through Merriton, but that was the last time.

  4. Oh!! So YOU”RE the guy that does the speed limit. :o )

  5. Very nice, Daniel!

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