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The Montreal section of the westbound Expo Limited included a set-off sleeper for Sudbury on Sunday, August 20, 1967.  SCOTSTOWN was the assigned car on Train 5 that morning.  S-2 7092 cut the car and placed it on a siding to await its return to Montreal at 10.45 that evening.  The CPR's Assignment of Space, Form 62-26, allocated it line number 520.  This was a convenient way to allow passengers to recognize the car in which they were travelling.  The line number appeared in a small box in the window alongside the vestibule.  To assign a passenger to a berth or room within a car, Reservation Desks in Windsor Station and other major terminals would have a cardboard representation of each car on which they would enter reservation or ticket numbers.  Smaller stations would wire or call the Reservation Desk to obtain a reservation for a passenger.  

My friend and retired CP employee, Doug Phillips of Calgary, offers the following history of CPR sleeping car SCOTSTOWN.  It was delivered from the Company's Angus Shops in Montreal in July 1930. The steel car body was built by the Canadian Car and Foundry of Montreal, and all the wood finish and interior fittings were completed by the craftsmen at Angus. The wood interior was of finished mahogany with rose flower inlays in the corners of the panels of each upper berth. The car was one of 25 ordered for 1930 delivery and was classified in the "S" series of sleeping cars and named after Scotstown, Quebec. A second order of 25 cars of the same series followed in 1931. The car's arrangement was twelve sections and one drawing room with a men's smoking room and a ladies' room. The first 25 cars of the 50 car order were assigned to the summer only 'Trans-Canada Limited.' Each car was 83' 10 ½" long, and three cars were assigned to each of the seven train sets required for the operation of the TCL, with the remaining four used as guard cars. With the discontinuance of the TCL, the cars were used on the 'Imperial' and' Dominion' trains. Sleeping car SCOTSTOWN would again be used in summer service in 1967 on the EXPO LIMITED and would be retired in October 1968 and subsequently scrapped.     

The image shows the odd-numbered side of the car.  The windows are in the toilet, the next three windows in the men's washroom, six sections eleven through one and three windows in the corridor opposite the three-person drawing room and the women's washroom.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Bill Linley all rights reserved.



Caption: The Montreal section of the westbound Expo Limited included a set-off sleeper for Sudbury on Sunday, August 20, 1967. SCOTSTOWN was the assigned car on Train 5 that morning. S-2 7092 cut the car and placed it on a siding to await its return to Montreal at 10.45 that evening. The CPR's Assignment of Space, Form 62-26, allocated it line number 520. This was a convenient way to allow passengers to recognize the car in which they were travelling. The line number appeared in a small box in the window alongside the vestibule. To assign a passenger to a berth or room within a car, Reservation Desks in Windsor Station and other major terminals would have a cardboard representation of each car on which they would enter reservation or ticket numbers. Smaller stations would wire or call the Reservation Desk to obtain a reservation for a passenger.

My friend and retired CP employee, Doug Phillips of Calgary, offers the following history of CPR sleeping car SCOTSTOWN. It was delivered from the Company's Angus Shops in Montreal in July 1930. The steel car body was built by the Canadian Car and Foundry of Montreal, and all the wood finish and interior fittings were completed by the craftsmen at Angus. The wood interior was of finished mahogany with rose flower inlays in the corners of the panels of each upper berth. The car was one of 25 ordered for 1930 delivery and was classified in the "S" series of sleeping cars and named after Scotstown, Quebec. A second order of 25 cars of the same series followed in 1931. The car's arrangement was twelve sections and one drawing room with a men's smoking room and a ladies' room. The first 25 cars of the 50 car order were assigned to the summer only 'Trans-Canada Limited.' Each car was 83' 10 ½" long, and three cars were assigned to each of the seven train sets required for the operation of the TCL, with the remaining four used as guard cars. With the discontinuance of the TCL, the cars were used on the 'Imperial' and' Dominion' trains. Sleeping car SCOTSTOWN would again be used in summer service in 1967 on the EXPO LIMITED and would be retired in October 1968 and subsequently scrapped.

The image shows the odd-numbered side of the car. The windows are in the toilet, the next three windows in the men's washroom, six sections eleven through one and three windows in the corridor opposite the three-person drawing room and the women's washroom.

Photographer:
Bill Linley [55] (more) (contact)
Date: 08/20/1967 (search)
Railway: Canadian Pacific (search)
Reporting Marks: Scotstown (search)
Train Symbol: 5 Expo Limited (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Mileage 79 Cartier Sub (search)
City/Town: Sudbury (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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Photo ID: 40151

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

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One Comment
  1. A classic! The heavyweight 12/1 cars were spread right across the whole continent They were the backbone of most railway’s sleeping car fleets for decades.

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