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In 1872 what became the Grand Trunk pushed thru the little community of Ainsleyville, Ontario and the town name after was changed for reasons unknown to me to Brussels. 
This little station served the line for many years; eventually it was moved to become the clubhouse for the town lawn bowling group. I remember visiting and the station was painted red.  Now, it has become the Optimist Club office and thankfully not altered, sits in quiet retirement.
Location is on road 12 on the north-east edge of town.
Copyright Notice: This image ©A.W.Mooney all rights reserved.



Caption: In 1872 what became the Grand Trunk pushed thru the little community of Ainsleyville, Ontario and the town name after was changed for reasons unknown to me to Brussels. This little station served the line for many years; eventually it was moved to become the clubhouse for the town lawn bowling group. I remember visiting and the station was painted red. Now, it has become the Optimist Club office and thankfully not altered, sits in quiet retirement. Location is on road 12 on the north-east edge of town.

Photographer:
A.W.Mooney [1745] (more) (contact)
Date: 06/01/2021 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: not applicable (search)
Train Symbol: n/a (search)
Subdivision/SNS: x-Kincadine Sub. (search)
City/Town: Brussels (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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Photo ID: 44463

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

Full size | Suncalc
Note: Read why maps changed. Suncalc.net for reference only.


5 Comments
  1. Ahhh, Mr. Mooney you are “on the road again, . . . . “, and bless that you are. Thanks to your efforts, your interest in history, and your photography skills, I get to see and learn about passenger train stations and their history that I have never seen before, nor will ever probably see. Thanks to those who preserved it, such a simple, elegant structure. Imagine what we would hear if those walls could talk. Thanks for posting, John

  2. Kind words. Thanks, John. At least with this Covid situation I have not found harm in just driving around having a look at everything.

  3. I agree….our hobby has been of great therapeutic value in this crisis. At he west end of Alyth Yard in Calgary, I can still see assorted railfan friends without violating the new rules……and, from my home in Strathmore, cover a lot of the CP mainline without contravening any of the Covid-related
    rules. Most of my co-workers, who have no such hobbies have a bad case of “jailhouse pallor”.

  4. Great photo Arnold! Of note, this station was larger in size. Befirebit was moved, the whole freight portion was removed, leaving only the passenger section as shown in your photo. Also, was insulbrucked upon my visit in 2003. Will have to see if I have a decent photo to post here showing that.

  5. Robin: Absolutely right. With a lockdown such as we have in Ontario, many days, without railfanning would pass by without a purpose.

    Todd: I wondered. But love this building just the way it has been preserved. Quaint and cute.

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