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With conductor and brakeman riding the head end, CN GP9RM's 7080 and 4119 work an afternoon local (likely #559) prowling the weed-grown Dixie Cup Spur in downtown Brampton. They've just crossed Railroad Street near Haggert Avenue, and are heading south to lift a small cut of boxcars from the Georgia Pacific plant down at the corner of Queen Street and McMurchy Avenue.

This was a right time, right place "lucky shot", as I had just feasted on two slices of Mackay Pizza and made my way from the Bramalea "M-section" downtown to Brampton station by bike, to see what was out on this nice August afternoon. Seeing the tail end of a short slow westbound freight clearing the diamond and crossing over to the south track, I deciding to try my luck and headed to my favourite spot near Fletcher's Creek. I crossed the tracks here, and saw the power already bushwacking its way through the weed garden visible behind 4119. At the time there were two Brampton area locals CN ran, (559 from MacMillan Yard that worked most of the Brampton and Peel customers, and 578 from Malport that worked most of the Bramalea customers), and the furthest and only customer west of downtown and the Peel interlocking was Georgia Pacific.

The US-based Dixie Cup Company (manufacturer of plastic and paper disposable cups and utensils) chose Brampton for a new Canadian plant that opened in 1949. It was expanded over the years, and changed ownership a few times. By the 1980's it was owned by the American Can Company, and present-day it's operated by Georgia Pacific. Locals in the area will remember the large iconic Dixie Cup styled water tower at the plant built to provide backup water for the fire department (that was torn down in 1987 after underground hydro pipes had made it obsolete). The rail spur was constructed around the time the plant was built, heading south along Haggert Ave. from CN's mainline at Mile 16.1 of the Brampton Sub (today known as the Halton Sub) crossing empty meadows and fields as the area north of the plant hadn't been developed yet. At one time, there was another customer located just to the north of the plant (since redeveloped into a residential neighbourhood).

The end of the Dixie Cup Spur came when the switch off the south track was removed sometime between Spring & Fall 2008, due to 3rd track installation for expanded GO Transit service on the Georgetown (Kitchener) line. It was never put back in (G-P likely switched everything to truck), and the spur was ripped up sometime between Spring-Fall 2012.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Dan Dell'Unto all rights reserved.



Caption: With conductor and brakeman riding the head end, CN GP9RM's 7080 and 4119 work an afternoon local (likely #559) prowling the weed-grown Dixie Cup Spur in downtown Brampton. They've just crossed Railroad Street near Haggert Avenue, and are heading south to lift a small cut of boxcars from the Georgia Pacific plant down at the corner of Queen Street and McMurchy Avenue.

This was a right time, right place "lucky shot", as I had just feasted on two slices of Mackay Pizza and made my way from the Bramalea "M-section" downtown to Brampton station by bike, to see what was out on this nice August afternoon. Seeing the tail end of a short slow westbound freight clearing the diamond and crossing over to the south track, I deciding to try my luck and headed to my favourite spot near Fletcher's Creek. I crossed the tracks here, and saw the power already bushwacking its way through the weed garden visible behind 4119. At the time there were two Brampton area locals CN ran, (559 from MacMillan Yard that worked most of the Brampton and Peel customers, and 578 from Malport that worked most of the Bramalea customers), and the furthest and only customer west of downtown and the Peel interlocking was Georgia Pacific.

The US-based Dixie Cup Company (manufacturer of plastic and paper disposable cups and utensils) chose Brampton for a new Canadian plant that opened in 1949. It was expanded over the years, and changed ownership a few times. By the 1980's it was owned by the American Can Company, and present-day it's operated by Georgia Pacific. Locals in the area will remember the large iconic Dixie Cup styled water tower at the plant built to provide backup water for the fire department (that was torn down in 1987 after underground hydro pipes had made it obsolete). The rail spur was constructed around the time the plant was built, heading south along Haggert Ave. from CN's mainline at Mile 16.1 of the Brampton Sub (today known as the Halton Sub) crossing empty meadows and fields as the area north of the plant hadn't been developed yet. At one time, there was another customer located just to the north of the plant (since redeveloped into a residential neighbourhood).

The end of the Dixie Cup Spur came when the switch off the south track was removed sometime between Spring & Fall 2008, due to 3rd track installation for expanded GO Transit service on the Georgetown (Kitchener) line. It was never put back in (G-P likely switched everything to truck), and the spur was ripped up sometime between Spring-Fall 2012.

Photographer:
Dan Dell'Unto [332] (more) (contact)
Date: 08/21/2006 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: CN 4119, 7080 (search)
Train Symbol: CN 559 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Dixie Cup Spur - CN Halton Sub (search)
City/Town: Brampton (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=27631
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Photo ID: 26474

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4 Comments
  1. Nice work Dano!!

  2. Yes it’s still open, but served only by truck and old right of way is now bare :(

  3. Interesting. Is the Dixie Cup factory still open?

  4. I always liked this short spur, but sadly never saw a train on it. Glad someone caught something running on it before its demise. Nice shot!

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