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A number of steam excursions were run in the 1970s using CN 6060 before she developed mechanical issues and the province had not the bother to want to invest in saving this historic locomotive. So, she was dealt off after 1980 to Alberta, where I understand she still is in operating condition. This Mountain Type locomotive, built by MLW in 1944, was last operating one of a group #'d 6060-6079. Nicknamed Bullet Nose Betty due to her shape, she was an immensely popular tourist and fan attraction. This 4-8-2 (wheel arrangement) ran excursions in Eastern Canada in the early 1970s before settling on becoming an attraction each Wednesday and Saturday in the summer months exciting the crowds on board by running from Toronto to Niagara Falls and return. Side trips from Niagara Falls over the Stamford Sub to Yager and return (where the train was wyed)while the Toronto riders enjoyed the Falls, could be had for around $10 and was well worth the adventure. Photographers could detrain at Yager while the train was turned. This image taken Aug. 24, 1977 shows the train reversing from Yager(mile 14.8) over the bridge above the Welland Canal RR underpass. Townline Tunnel Road is directly beneath the locomotive. The engine is run on oil, not coal, and this smoke plume is one of the largest I had ever seen in my days of following this beast around. One begs the question: Why are steam engines referred to in the feminine gender? Its because they always have a tender behind.
Copyright Notice: This image ©A.W. Mooney all rights reserved.



Caption: A number of steam excursions were run in the 1970s using CN 6060 before she developed mechanical issues and the province had not the bother to want to invest in saving this historic locomotive. So, she was dealt off after 1980 to Alberta, where I understand she still is in operating condition. This Mountain Type locomotive, built by MLW in 1944, was last operating one of a group #'d 6060-6079. Nicknamed Bullet Nose Betty due to her shape, she was an immensely popular tourist and fan attraction. This 4-8-2 (wheel arrangement) ran excursions in Eastern Canada in the early 1970s before settling on becoming an attraction each Wednesday and Saturday in the summer months exciting the crowds on board by running from Toronto to Niagara Falls and return. Side trips from Niagara Falls over the Stamford Sub to Yager and return (where the train was wyed)while the Toronto riders enjoyed the Falls, could be had for around $10 and was well worth the adventure. Photographers could detrain at Yager while the train was turned. This image taken Aug. 24, 1977 shows the train reversing from Yager(mile 14.8) over the bridge above the Welland Canal RR underpass. Townline Tunnel Road is directly beneath the locomotive. The engine is run on oil, not coal, and this smoke plume is one of the largest I had ever seen in my days of following this beast around. One begs the question: Why are steam engines referred to in the feminine gender? Its because they always have a tender behind.

Photographer:
A.W. Mooney [1821] (more) (contact)
Date: 08/24/1977 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: CNR 6060 (search)
Train Symbol: Not Provided
Subdivision/SNS: CN Stamford Sub. (search)
City/Town: Welland (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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Photo ID: 11188

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

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