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The scene at West Toronto diamond in 1965, looking east off the old Weston Road bridge that once crossed over the tracks here. Note the abundance of section houses by the diamond and the relatively new signal bungalow, which replaced the West Toronto interlocking tower (that was demolished not too long before this photo was taken) when the interlocking here was modernized. The CP Galt Sub curves under the bridge in the foreground, part of the diamonds for the North Toronto and CN Brampton (Weston) Subs are visible behind the signal bungalow, and the MacTier Sub curves north in the background from Osler Ave.  But probably the most notable thing in this photo: a Canadian Pacific Transfer run heads west to CP's Lambton and West Toronto Yards with CP 8917 in charge, a rare H24-66 "Trainmaster". Built in the 50's by Canadian licensee Canadian Locomotive Company in Kingston using Fairbanks Morse designs and opposed-piston engine technology, the Trainmasters were the most powerful units of their time, turning out 2400 horsepower from a 12-cyliner opposed-piston engine (24 pistons in 12 cylinders!). CP ordered a total of 21 and for a time employed them all over the system, with a 1965 Eastern Region diesel assignment sheet showing 8917 and 8918 assigned Toronto to handle transfer runs between Lambton/West Toronto, Parkdale and Agincourt Yards, often running solo due to their high horsepower. They were also used on mainline freights in the region with other manufacturer's units.  Ultimately FM/CLC stopped making locomotives in the late 50's, and CP eventually shied away from the more maintenance-intensive CLC engine design. A group of Trainmasters were retired in the late 60's and sold to a supply dealer for engine salvage and scrapping, with the rest of the small fleet dwindling over time until the last three were retired in 1976. 8917 here was retired in April of 1972, and cut up for scrap at CP's Angus Shops in Montreal QC during early 1973.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Bill Thomson all rights reserved.



Caption: The scene at West Toronto diamond in 1965, looking east off the old Weston Road bridge that once crossed over the tracks here. Note the abundance of section houses by the diamond and the relatively new signal bungalow, which replaced the West Toronto interlocking tower (that was demolished not too long before this photo was taken) when the interlocking here was modernized. The CP Galt Sub curves under the bridge in the foreground, part of the diamonds for the North Toronto and CN Brampton (Weston) Subs are visible behind the signal bungalow, and the MacTier Sub curves north in the background from Osler Ave.

But probably the most notable thing in this photo: a Canadian Pacific Transfer run heads west to CP's Lambton and West Toronto Yards with CP 8917 in charge, a rare H24-66 "Trainmaster". Built in the 50's by Canadian licensee Canadian Locomotive Company in Kingston using Fairbanks Morse designs and opposed-piston engine technology, the Trainmasters were the most powerful units of their time, turning out 2400 horsepower from a 12-cyliner opposed-piston engine (24 pistons in 12 cylinders!). CP ordered a total of 21 and for a time employed them all over the system, with a 1965 Eastern Region diesel assignment sheet showing 8917 and 8918 assigned Toronto to handle transfer runs between Lambton/West Toronto, Parkdale and Agincourt Yards, often running solo due to their high horsepower. They were also used on mainline freights in the region with other manufacturer's units.

Ultimately FM/CLC stopped making locomotives in the late 50's, and CP eventually shied away from the more maintenance-intensive CLC engine design. A group of Trainmasters were retired in the late 60's and sold to a supply dealer for engine salvage and scrapping, with the rest of the small fleet dwindling over time until the last three were retired in 1976. 8917 here was retired in April of 1972, and cut up for scrap at CP's Angus Shops in Montreal QC during early 1973.

Photographer:
Bill Thomson [715] (more) (contact)
Date: 1965 (search)
Railway: Canadian Pacific (search)
Reporting Marks: CP 8917 (search)
Train Symbol: CP Transfer (search)
Subdivision/SNS: West Toronto - CP Galt Sub (search)
City/Town: Toronto (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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Photo ID: 14849

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

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2 Comments
  1. Fantastic write up, Bill. Just want to add that the FM engines were originally used in submarines in WW2, and were 2 stroke!. The cooling systems werent sealed and had to be refilled with water, like a steamer, several times a day. The last FM TRainmasters could be found working the Cominco Smelter in Trail, BC pulling very heavy trains up to Warfield, BC.

  2. Like the ALCO PA1, the FM H24-66 could be accepted as an honorary steam locomotive.

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