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Framed in industrial pipelines and steel fencing, USS Hamilton SW900 #84 is rolling back to the inaccessible depths of US Steel's sprawling Hamilton works after having placed 9 coil cars in the building behind it. Life clings precariously to the Stelwire fence - waiting for the opportunity to once again flourish in this man made industrial world. Might not be too long either.

Much can be said about the future of US Steel Hamilton (Stelco) - the day after I took this photo United States Steel announced in a quarterly and regulatory filing their plans to cut off US Steel Canada from the parent company, and forcing receivership. As a native Hamiltonian - it's sad to see the once glorious Stelco wither - but at least I've been able to see and photograph something like this in 2014. USS bought Stelco Canada in 2007 in a bidding war against Russian conglomerate OAO Severstal - Severstal has since closed the US plants they purchased in lieu of Stelco. Essentially, United States Steel was forced to keep Stelco alive for nearly 10 years. Will it survive? If you read the media, all signs point to no - but we have to wait and see what happens - coke making licenses are not being given out in North America any longer and I suspect it will be of value to the purchaser. However, as a taxpayer, whoever wishes to continue coke making operations should be forced to continue to make steel on-site and give Hamilton economic benefit for the pollution being created, or close Coke making at USS Hamilton permanently.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Stephen C. Host all rights reserved.



Caption: Framed in industrial pipelines and steel fencing, USS Hamilton SW900 #84 is rolling back to the inaccessible depths of US Steel's sprawling Hamilton works after having placed 9 coil cars in the building behind it. Life clings precariously to the Stelwire fence - waiting for the opportunity to once again flourish in this man made industrial world. Might not be too long either.

Much can be said about the future of US Steel Hamilton (Stelco) - the day after I took this photo United States Steel announced in a quarterly and regulatory filing their plans to cut off US Steel Canada from the parent company, and forcing receivership. As a native Hamiltonian - it's sad to see the once glorious Stelco wither - but at least I've been able to see and photograph something like this in 2014.

USS bought Stelco in 2007 in a bidding war against Russian conglomerate OAO Severstal - Severstal has since closed the US plants they purchased in lieu of Stelco. Essentially, United States Steel was forced to keep Stelco alive for nearly 10 years. Will it survive? If you read the media, all signs point to no - but we have to wait and see what happens - coke making licenses are not being given out in North America any longer and I suspect it will be of value to the purchaser. However, as a taxpayer, whoever wishes to continue coke making operations should be forced to continue to make steel on-site and give Hamilton economic benefit for the pollution being created, or close Coke making at USS Hamilton permanently.

Photographer:
Stephen C. Host [1039] (more) (contact)
Date: 09/15/2014 (search)
Railway: Industrial (search)
Reporting Marks: 84 (search)
Train Symbol: Not Provided
Subdivision/SNS: Not Provided
City/Town: Hamilton (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=16419
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Photo ID: 15393

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

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5 Comments
  1. Unfortunately, Stelco has made a second in-road with Trackmobiles. They are now using a Trackmobile Atlas (largest unit available).

    Seems the Switchers days may be very numbered.

  2. According to our local paper, 1981 was a bell weather year for Stelco due to the lengthy strike (which greatly diminished my university fund!), ongoing recession and opening of Lake Erie Works/Nanticoke and the associated mammoth debt.

  3. No problem – thanks for posting the oldies. I know these industrial ops are a niche – but I like it :) Why was the summer of ’81 fateful?

  4. Many thanks Steve for continuing to seek out signs of life at the former Canadian steel giant property. My father spent almost half of his life in the employ of Stelco and I was a student during the fateful summer of 1981 at the Hilton Works complex. It’s difficult to drive along Burlington Street and not remember the former glory and importance of this complex.

  5. I always like to see pics of oddball trains Nice photo!

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