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On Sunday, August 21st of 2016 Canadian Pacific train 235 collided with 118 at the Howland crossover in midtown Toronto just after 5am. CP 118 (taken away at time of the picture) was crossing over from the North to the South track at Howland crossover (the crossover pictured) while CP 235 was running light power (the 2 engines pictured) from CP's Toronto Agincourt yard to either Spence Yard on the MacTier Subdivsion or straight to Lambton Yard on the Galt Subdivision to pick up their train and proceed west. The rumor is that CP 235 was not paying attention to their signals and came around the corner barreling at Howland at upwards of 50mph, ran the red block and side swiped the last 18 cars of 118's train in the crossover. The results, a shaken up however okay crew, yet fired from further rail operations. I guess even the crossover's name correlates with the accident.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Max Skorynin all rights reserved.



Caption: On Sunday, August 21st of 2016 Canadian Pacific train 235 collided with 118 at the Howland crossover in midtown Toronto just after 5am. CP 118 (taken away at time of the picture) was crossing over from the North to the South track at Howland crossover (the crossover pictured) while CP 235 was running light power (the 2 engines pictured) from CP's Toronto Agincourt yard to either Spence Yard on the MacTier Subdivsion or straight to Lambton Yard on the Galt Subdivision to pick up their train and proceed west. The rumor is that CP 235 was not paying attention to their signals and came around the corner barreling at Howland at upwards of 50mph, ran the red block and side swiped the last 18 cars of 118's train in the crossover. The results, a shaken up however okay crew. I guess even the crossover's name correlates with the accident.

Photographer:
Max Skorynin [195] (more) (contact)
Date: 8/21/2016 (search)
Railway: Canadian Pacific (search)
Reporting Marks: CP 8849 (search)
Train Symbol: CP 235-21 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: CP North Toronto Sub (search)
City/Town: The Annex, Toronto (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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14 Comments
  1. ngineered4u; I think you missed my point. No this appears to be human error. However, I was referring to the broader issue of moving bulk hazardous cargo; the on going questions of crew rest that seem to be getting worse, the reductions in track maintenance staff. If you’re going to run 130 car oil trains through midtown Toronto, they’d better make sure that they’re looking after the plant; and their people. Because right now we have no idea of 235′s crew rest or if they just messed up. You’re right though; nothing is bullet proof.

  2. @Dave Brook… means that the railroads need to step up their safety game, pay more attention to the plant and the state of the crews? The derailment was caused by human error. It had nothing to do with the physical plant and so far we know NOTHING about the state of the crews.
    If human beings are involved in any mode of transport there will always be a chance of an accident and since humans build computers, accidents can still happen. Period

  3. Yes, it’s a minor thing in the big picture, but it’s major in that the result would be very different if they’d plowed into the side of an oil train at Dufferin and Bathurst. So in a sense, everyone is lucky. What Lisa Raitt understands about it you could write in foot high letters on the head of a pin, but with the movement of oil by rail, which I’m completely in favour if, means that the railroads need to step up their safety game, pay more attention to the plant and the state of the crews, and care just a little less about the stockholders. The bar has been raised.

  4. the sad part about this – although a relatively minor mishap…the RR’s in Canada have become so politicized with Crude accidents…that this derailment has been on the national, business news, and local TV stations all day; I’ve seen Lisa Raitt on TV about it;..because it was in the heart of the city. Before 2012..it barely would have made page 5 of the paper, if that.

  5. Marty Cej, CP Spokesman ( used to a BNN anchor ) already issued a stmt yesterday saying it was human error.

  6. It is what I call “smashed GEVO”

    Still where did they reroute?

  7. Maxim you’ve learned a valuable lesson. What people say… is just that, a rumour and subject to a LOT of BS :)

  8. Guys, what I heard on the spot of the accident is what I wrote. Next time I’ll refrain from writing “rumours” or details.

  9. I totally agree with RLK2211!

  10. Guys, you are welcome to dislike a caption but our youngest photographers don’t know any different nor do they understand the Grievance process.

    Max is just young and ill informed and doesn’t know any better. Perhaps though he (and others) will learn a thing or two. Also, never trust what the media says , especially about Railroading.

    I’m just glad no one got hurt. Let’s leave it at that :)

  11. Well put RLK2211, I also “Dislike the caption for this photo”.

    Things aren’t always as black and white as you may think, case in point.

    http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/rail/2014/r14t0294/r14t0294.asp

  12. I don’t think you should speculate on “rumours”?

    You don’t know what happened here….rumours are nine times out of ten imbelished and sensationalized.

    Dislike the caption for this photo.

    Sorry

  13. I don’t know for certain but what I think if you run a red, you’re done right away. Other sources suggest you’re “on vacation” for 30 or 90 days until the investigation is complete and then you’re fired.

  14. So the crew was “fired” the day of the incident ???

    That seems unusually fast and is almost a guaranteed violation of their collective agreement. I’ve never heard of the company constructing and conducting an investigation that swiftly, plus what about their right to notice of investigation in writing and to be able to make arrangements for union representation ?

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