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Ah... The double header. One of the few reasons I will find enough energy to get out my camera to shoot Amtrak's Maple Leaf. Every day I remind myself not to take it for granted considering the low ridership it gets, though the consists are generally so lackluster I just can't bother. Double headers are rare at best on the Maple Leaf. Out of the dozens of times I saw it last year I only remember seeing it double headed once. Prior to that I hadn't seen it since 2011. The P42's are getting old though and although many saw complete overhauls around their 10 year mark, the next 10 years have come and gone and it doesn't appear any second overhaul plans are in sight. That being said, 104 is looking worse for wear, and many of its close relatives that have come through recently did not look much better. Since this picture was taken, at least two more double headers have come through. What had been rare is now an occasional sight. Either this is indicating the P42's are starting to suffer, or perhaps there is now a surplus of units with the Siemens Charger units entering service in the U.S (hopefully none ever make it this way). 

Along with Amtrak's lack of photo appeal, the Albany division has been trying to keep more westward based power from the Lakeshore Limited away from northeast short-medium distance trains recently. 100-111 are most common now, which have all been assigned to the northeast most of their lives. However, 87 was tacked in behind 104 here, perhaps due to mechanical issues on 104. Essentially, chances for heritage units to come through are a lot slimmer than they were just a year ago.

If you're able to zoom in, the end of CN 422 can be seen exiting the Jordan dip. One bright side of the CN Grimsby Sub is the line only has two mild curves between Hamilton and Seaway. It isn't the CASO by any means, but probably is one of straighter lines in Canada, giving ample notice if a train is approaching. The track itself looks better since CN sprayed some weed killer here a few months ago, which was a welcome surprise. As for the trespassers, they were not expecting the Amtrak to pop out of the Jordan dip evidently. They decided to stay their course however, and not surprisingly received a horn barrage from the crew.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Daniel Odette all rights reserved.



Caption: Ah... The double header. One of the few reasons I will find enough energy to get out my camera to shoot Amtrak's Maple Leaf. Every day I remind myself not to take it for granted considering the low ridership it gets, though the consists are generally so lackluster I just can't bother. Double headers are rare at best on the Maple Leaf. Out of the dozens of times I saw it last year I only remember seeing it double headed once. Prior to that I hadn't seen it since 2011. The P42's are getting old though and although many saw complete overhauls around their 10 year mark, the next 10 years have come and gone and it doesn't appear any second overhaul plans are in sight. That being said, 104 is looking worse for wear, and many of its close relatives that have come through recently did not look much better. Since this picture was taken, at least two more double headers have come through. What had been rare is now an occasional sight. Either this is indicating the P42's are starting to suffer, or perhaps there is now a surplus of units with the Siemens Charger units entering service in the U.S (hopefully none ever make it this way).

Along with Amtrak's lack of photo appeal, the Albany division has been trying to keep more westward based power from the Lakeshore Limited away from northeast short-medium distance trains recently. 100-111 are most common now, which have all been assigned to the northeast most of their lives. However, 87 was tacked in behind 104 here, perhaps due to mechanical issues on 104. Essentially, chances for heritage units to come through are a lot slimmer than they were just a year ago.

If you're able to zoom in, the end of CN 422 can be seen exiting the Jordan dip. One bright side of the CN Grimsby Sub is the line only has two mild curves between Hamilton and Seaway. It isn't the CASO by any means, but probably is one of straighter lines in Canada, giving ample notice if a train is approaching. The track itself looks better since CN sprayed some weed killer here a few months ago, which was a welcome surprise. As for the trespassers, they were not expecting the Amtrak to pop out of the Jordan dip evidently. They decided to stay their course however, and not surprisingly received a horn barrage from the crew.

Photographer:
Daniel Odette [153] (more) (contact)
Date: 09/07/2017 (search)
Railway: Amtrak (search)
Reporting Marks: AMTK 104 (search)
Train Symbol: VIA P09731 07 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Mile 11.7 CN Grimsby Subdivision - St. Catharines (search)
City/Town: St. Catharines (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=31035
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2 Comments
  1. Great shot.

  2. 100-111 certainly common on the Adirondack into Montreal recently as well I noticed, of course from the same power pool.

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