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CP 8797-8793 head up what is now CP's Hamilton Sub. toward Guelph Jct.  According to Paul Duncan's web site, this may have been the Goderich Sub at the time when this picture was taken.  I am hoping that I got the geotagging correct as it is hard to pinpoint today with all of the vegetation growth covering landmarks on google maps.  I believe the railing that you see in the middle of the picture is the lookout at what is now the McQueston plaque off York Blvd. in Hamilton.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Dave Burroughs all rights reserved.



Caption: CP 8797-8793 head up what is now CP's Hamilton Sub. toward Guelph Jct. According to Paul Duncan's web site, this may have been the Goderich Sub at the time when this picture was taken. I am hoping that I got the geotagging correct as it is hard to pinpoint today with all of the vegetation growth covering landmarks on google maps. I believe the railing that you see in the middle of the picture is the lookout at what is now the McQueston plaque off York Blvd. in Hamilton.

Photographer:
Dave Burroughs [127] (more) (contact)
Date: 03/1968 (search)
Railway: Canadian Pacific (search)
Reporting Marks: CP 8797 (search)
Train Symbol: Not Provided
Subdivision/SNS: Hamilton Jct / Hamilton Sub (search)
City/Town: Hamilton (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=35211
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Photo ID: 34020

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

Full size | Suncalc
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19 Comments
  1. what was the middle track?

  2. Given the time of day, the train is more likely an “Aberdeen Turn” from London–note the class lights and “extra” flags. (No. 87 to Goderich was scheduled to depart Hamilton Jct at 11:30 PM, according to an April 1968 ETT in my collection.)

    Great shot of favourite engines, Dave!

  3. Thanks for the info John. I also though I answered the question about the middle track being the Cow Path track. The second main track is not visible at the bottom left corner of the pic.

  4. Dave there is only two tracks today up the path…what was the middle track in this pic – back then?

  5. Tracks from back to front, CP to Guelph Jct, Cowpath, CN Oakville Sub (one of two tracks visible)

  6. OK, Dave…I thought you were standing in the south end of the cowpath and I couldnt figure out what it was — it seems that CN cowpath track is really small rail?

  7. You got me thinking about that. That middle track is a dead end track and can be seen in sdfourty’s pic here.
    https://tinyurl.com/y9lbffd7
    So, the track in the foreground seems to be the cowpath. Thanks for raising the question.
    It would be nice if anyone could shed some light on the track arrangement here in the late 60′s.

  8. The diamond with the cowpath between CN/CP connector is also most interesting in Steve Danko’s shot!

  9. Re John Eull’s comment…it is most likely the Aberdeen turn. It was run at any time out of the Quebec St. East Pool when traffic warranted. Most common time was ordered London for 1800 or so, turning out of Aberdeen upon arrival which could be 12 hrs later or less. If the crew booked rest on arrival they slept in the van (hogger in a room at the shop) so that could be the case here, or it was ordered later out of London and turned on arrival..

  10. Thanks Ronald for the info especially about the crew booking rest. That is something that I did not know.

  11. I took another look at this & I note it looks like the trailing unit has a ‘lightweight’ truck under the cab. This happened with the older MLWs, not so common on RS-18s though.

  12. Ron, educate us all with regard to the lightweight trucks please. The only possible difference I think I see is no leaf spring in the truck under the trailing unit cab.

    Thanks…

  13. Regarding the lightweight trucks, Dave your photo of CN 3874/3201 near Bayview clearly illustrates the difference of what they look like externally. Some CN units were built with the lightweight truck but so far as I know CP only had them as built, on part of the RS-23 order. Since they are interchangeable with AAR Type B trucks, they sometimes ended up on any MLW units including cab units. The theory was that they rode rough so if possible they were not to be put under the cab end of the unit if possible.That seems to have given way to convenience though & they’ve ended up on either end.Once you start looking at photos there are plenty of examples. There’s a bit more info on Page 107 of “Canadian Pacific Diesel Locomotives” by Murray Dean/David Hanna if you have or can locate a copy.

  14. OK, I think I have it now. Basically, if you see 4 coil springs and no leaf spring, it should be a lightweight truck. Here is a good example of what I am talking about regarding the 4 coil springs.
    http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=28249
    And would this would be an example of the standard trucks with the leaf spring and 4 coil springs exposed?
    http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=28250

  15. Oops, wrong URL for the lightweight. Should be this one.
    http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=35277

  16. Somehow I forgot to come back and reply to your last posts on this, so here I am back after a few months. One link you posted shows the standard AAR Type B truck on the 3887 and the lightweight on the trailing unit 3679. The casting itself is different on the lightweight as well as the absence of a leaf spring as you mentioned. http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=35277

  17. Oops, this link..I got it wrong too. http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=28250

  18. This is great information. Things I didn’t know :) Great work gang.

    Anyone get an answer to that ‘second track’ beside the cowpath? I bet asking Mr. Doug Page might get an answer..

  19. I saw this pic again & another thought about CP London crews booking rest at Aberdeen, came up. I was looking at my old timebooks and recall that crews who did book rest sometimes woke up in the morning to find enough London bound freight for almost 2 trains. If there was a bit over tonnage rating of units, they’d shoot you out of there and you’d run until you stalled, then double to Waterdown North. But if there was a lot over, you’d run half to Guelph Jct & come back van hop for the rest. That was a good deal for crews, they got an extra day for that Guelph Jct turn out of Aberdeen.

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