Welcome Visitor. First time here? Like what you see? Bookmark us for when you are bored, and check out 'top shots' and 'fantastic (editors choice)' in the menu above, you won't be dissapointed. Join our community! click here to sign up for an account today. Sick of this message? Get rid of it by logging-in here.

The 50th anniversary of New York Central's demise has brought about some amazing photos from fellow contributors, so I might as well upload this before the year's end.

Coincidentally enough, Norfolk Southern's NYC heritage unit managed to end up on the Buffalo-Fort Erie transfer in time for the big 50, sandwiched between NS 9187 and chiselled nose SD70M 2593. This is believed to be NS 1066's first visit, so it was good timing. NYC's presence on this section of the Canada Southern was not well documented, however Fort Erie was a significant hub for them. Track 99, which was the former CASO Fort Erie yard bypass track, is behind the autoracks, now owned by CN. Only about a quarter mile west of here is where the Chippawa Branch split off to Niagara Falls. The part of the CASO ROW that extends towards Welland was torn up a few years ago as far as Stevensville. The rest remains in CP's hands, now known as the Stevensville Spur.

The NS transfer typically ends up with around three to four heritage units a year. NS 1066 (NYC heritage) appears to be the first to visit that had any major significance to past railroad history in the area. The Wabash unit almost showed up once, but the air compressor failed before leaving Buffalo.

Being a bright spot in what is becoming an increasing dilapidated and depressing part of Fort Erie, NS C93 and the NYC heritage unit completed their yard work within a couple hours and waited some length of time to get clearance back stateside. Past memories of this train involved a typically much shorter consist, and the train would get clearance back into Buffalo almost immediately after finishing work. It's not quite as simple as it used to be, but at least the train is longer. Somewhat frequently now, CN has to run an X422 just to handle how much traffic NS is bringing across. Looking back about 10 years down to the month, this is when the Great Recession really began to take its toll on Niagara's rail traffic. CP never recovered it, though CN seems to be at its strongest point in the area since then.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Daniel Odette all rights reserved.



Caption: The 50th anniversary of New York Central's demise has brought about some amazing photos from fellow contributors, so I might as well upload this before the year's end.

Coincidentally enough, Norfolk Southern's NYC heritage unit managed to end up on the Buffalo-Fort Erie transfer in time for the big 50, sandwiched between NS 9187 and chiselled nose SD70M 2593. This is believed to be NS 1066's first visit, so it was good timing. NYC's presence on this section of the Canada Southern was not well documented, however Fort Erie was a significant hub for them. Track 99, which was the former CASO Fort Erie yard bypass track, is behind the autoracks, now owned by CN. Only about a quarter mile west of here is where the Chippawa Branch split off to Niagara Falls. The part of the CASO ROW that extends towards Welland was torn up a few years ago as far as Stevensville. The rest remains in CP's hands, now known as the Stevensville Spur.

The NS transfer typically ends up with around three to four heritage units a year. NS 1066 (NYC heritage) appears to be the first to visit that had any major significance to past railroad history in the area. The Wabash unit almost showed up once, but the air compressor failed before leaving Buffalo.

Being a bright spot in what is becoming an increasing dilapidated and depressing part of Fort Erie, NS C93 and the NYC heritage unit completed their yard work within a couple hours and waited some length of time to get clearance back stateside. Past memories of this train involved a typically much shorter consist, and the train would get clearance back into Buffalo almost immediately after finishing work. It's not quite as simple as it used to be, but at least the train is longer. Somewhat frequently now, CN has to run an X422 just to handle how much traffic NS is bringing across. Looking back about 10 years down to the month, this is when the Great Recession really began to take its toll on Niagara's rail traffic. CP never recovered it, though CN seems to be at its strongest point in the area since then.

Photographer:
Daniel Odette [153] (more) (contact)
Date: 03/18/2018 (search)
Railway: Norfolk Southern (search)
Reporting Marks: NS 9187 (search)
Train Symbol: NS C93-18 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Mile 2.9 CN Stamford Subdivision (search)
City/Town: Fort Erie (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=35248
Click here to Log-in or Register and add your vote.

10 Favourites
View count: 413 Views

Share this image on Facebook, Twitter or email using the icons below
Photo ID: 34057

NEW MAP IN BETA:

Full size | Suncalc
Note: Greedy Google forced us to change and suncalc.net also working on a fix.. stay tuned

3 Comments
  1. Yes, they are great aren’t they. I still won’t make the drive :)

  2. Thanks. You can thank the railfans in Buffalo that always give a heads up. I’m too far even to catch them crossing the International bridge, so this is my best bet unfortunately.

  3. Nice find. Fort Erie is too far for me to bother for heritage units if I know about it, so glad you’re getting ‘em :)

Railpictures.ca © 2006-2020 all rights reserved. Photographs are copyright of the photographer and used with permission
Terms and conditions | About us