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A couple of BCOL cowls were on 330 the night before, so I was hoping to catch them on 331 the next day. I had plans for most of the day though, and the forecast was only showing sun in the morning, so I decided to head them off in Port Rob, where I could get light on them heading out before the clouds rolled in, and so that I could get on with my day. CN and the weather had different plans for me though, of course. I arrived just after 0600 and saw 422 was sitting at Port Robinson West ready to depart, having been built by a night crew. With no crews in sight, no cowls in sight, and having seen 143 in Hamilton as I was leaving town, I went for it and caught it at CN Robbins to start the day. I got back to Port Rob as the sun was fully up and crews were arriving. 422 departed shortly after, with bright sun on the nose, rain clouds rolling in behind, and a grumpy 2188 trailing behind 2600, doing its best to remind the neighbours that air quality around here can change in an instant. Once 422 had left, the crew of 330 quickly built their 2500 feet of train. But by this point the clouds had fully rolled in. I shot them leaving Port Rob, and again in Merriton, where I/they beat the rain by a matter of seconds. I will probably post one of those one day, as it's hard to go wrong with a pair of cowls.
Copyright Notice: This image ©James Knott all rights reserved.



Caption: A couple of BCOL cowls were on 330 the night before, so I was hoping to catch them on 331 the next day. I had plans for most of the day though, and the forecast was only showing sun in the morning, so I decided to head them off in Port Rob, where I could get light on them heading out before the clouds rolled in, and so that I could get on with my day. CN and the weather had different plans for me though, of course. I arrived just after 0600 and saw 422 was sitting at Port Robinson West ready to depart, having been built by a night crew. With no crews in sight, no cowls in sight, and having seen 143 in Hamilton as I was leaving town, I went for it and caught it at CN Robbins to start the day.

I got back to Port Rob as the sun was fully up and crews were arriving. 422 departed shortly after, with bright sun on the nose, rain clouds rolling in behind, and a grumpy 2188 trailing behind 2600, doing its best to remind the neighbours that air quality around here can change in an instant.

Once 422 had left, the crew of 330 quickly built their 2500 feet of train. But by this point the clouds had fully rolled in. I shot them leaving Port Rob, and again in Merriton, where I/they beat the rain by a matter of seconds. I will probably post one of those one day, as it's hard to go wrong with a pair of cowls.

Photographer:
James Knott [209] (more) (contact)
Date: 06/15/2019 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: CN 2600 (search)
Train Symbol: 422 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Stamford Sub (search)
City/Town: Port Robinson (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=37968
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Photo ID: 36775

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One Comment
  1. Smoke is so thick it is making shadow on the trees to the right. RTC this is CN2600, we’re rollin’ coal at mile 24 and makin’ goodtime. :-)

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