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From December 1973 or January 1974. My view from the caboose near mile 809 or at Nig Creek on the BC Rail Fort St. John sub. We had departed our crew change point at Beatton, mile 816.5 and heading south to our home terminal at Chetwynd mile 659.3. Looking at the images it was a bitterly cold morning. Thank goodness for the two oil heaters in the caboose. The images show a typical train of that era, logs, boxcars and tanks. Also we could have pellet sulphur, wood chips and other general freight as well as TOFC. The track at the time was in reasonable shape and we would rock & roll along at 25 mph. I do not recall why the RS3 was mixed in with the loaded log cars although there are two RS18's on the head end and I don't recall any unit weight or axle restrictions on bridges etc.  When I left Chetwynd for the last time in 1976, the track was in rough shape north of Fort St. John with 90 continous miles at 10 mph, making for some incredibly mind numbing trips.
   Note the TH&B boxcar, a long way from home. Perhaps it had been previously loaded with track spikes from Stelco or farm machinery from MF in Brantford. At the time of this image I had been "out west" less than a year and the TH&B box car was a fond memory of my previous employer, the TH&B.
all ancient history and memories. 
thanks for looking.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Doug Lawson all rights reserved.



Caption: From December 1973 or January 1974. My view from the caboose near mile 809 or at Nig Creek on the BC Rail Fort St. John sub. We had departed our crew change point at Beatton, mile 816.5 and heading south to our home terminal at Chetwynd mile 659.3. Looking at the images it was a bitterly cold morning. Thank goodness for the two oil heaters in the caboose. The images show a typical train of that era, logs, boxcars and tanks. Also we could have pellet sulphur, wood chips and other general freight as well as TOFC. The track at the time was in reasonable shape and we would rock & roll along at 25 mph. I do not recall why the RS3 was mixed in with the loaded log cars although there are two RS18's on the head end and I don't recall any unit weight or axle restrictions on bridges etc. When I left Chetwynd for the last time in 1976, the track was in rough shape north of Fort St. John with 90 continous miles at 10 mph, making for some incredibly mind numbing trips. Note the TH&B boxcar, a long way from home. Perhaps it had been previously loaded with track spikes from Stelco or farm machinery from MF in Brantford. At the time of this image I had been "out west" less than a year and the TH&B box car was a fond memory of my previous employer, the TH&B. all ancient history and memories. thanks for looking.

Photographer:
Doug Lawson [193] (more) (contact)
Date: 12/??/1973 (search)
Railway: BC Rail (search)
Reporting Marks: Not Provided
Train Symbol: Extra south (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Fort St. John sub near Nig Creek (search)
City/Town: Nig (search)
Province: British Columbia (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=38558
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Photo ID: 37365

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2 Comments
  1. I can feel the cold in this. Great stuff.

  2. What a difference from TH&B to BC Rail in northern BC!
    Beautiful picture and yes it looks COLD!
    Thanks for posting.

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