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For my 100th RP.ca image and the last for 2020 lets go back to Aug 19th 1984. I'm working as a CP Operator at the temporary train order station Kaministiquia.  The wood caboose CP437188 is not just my office, but my accommodation. 
 I worked here for about six weeks on loan from the London Division.  The trainorder signal on the roof was operated using two chains and a hook inside the van. Westbounds would get orders here as they had the track gangs out working between Kam and Raith and would crossover here. The double track main was also left hand running which took some getting used to. A lunchbox radio was used to contact the Winnipeg Dispatcher. Once a train was cleared it, the orders were clipped into a wood hoop. The trainorder signal only had two positions red/green so if orders were 19y (Yellow) you would place the signal red and use a yellow flag.  On the weekends they Operators were allowed to go to the hotel in Thunder Bay. If the van needed servicing (Stove oil, fresh water tank filled and crapper cleaned out) the signal had to be secured by climbling on the roof, pulling out a large cotter pin and lowering the whole signal and posts onto the roof and then strapping it down.  The first time I did this was at night in the rain. I didn't realize it weighed more than I did and it came crashing down and the light came off and went off the roof, luckily it held on by the electric wire and I did not fall off the roof. 
  The accomodations were pretty sparse.  Just a caboose mattress for bed (BYO Sleeping bag) and an oil stove (BYO food) and toilet. Luckily the gang cars got parked in the siding across the tracks and I was able to take advantage of the kitchen car and commandeer some hot meals. 
  Here we see an Extra East led by 5937-5924 and two B&O GP40's passing my office.  I was able to shoot this as they did not require orders.  On the right side you can see my 1976 Chrysler Cordoba that I purchased from Bruce Mercer while I was working in Chatham. That car got totalled a few days after returning to Windsor when I got hit by an impaired delivery truck driver. (No injuries)
 I also worked at Dyment and Hawk Lake on the Ignace Sub before returning home.  
 One funny story, the temporary trainorder station hours were listed on trainorder given out of Thunder Bay. I believe it was a stat holiday, maybe Labour Day and this Westbound comes flying around the corner (Usually they would slow right down) and I'm standing there, signal red waving the yellow flag in one hand and hoop in the other. Well the front door of the SD40 flies open and the headend trainman just makes it to the steps to snag the hoop which proceeds to whack him in the face. The train is now in full emergency braking and when stopped I see the headend trainman marching hastily towards my van with hoop in hand. "Oh S**t" I make a hasty retreat and lock the door thinking he was pissed at me. Turns out he was mad at the hogger who assumed the office would not be open on a stat. By this time the Conudctor has walked up from the van to see whats going on. After getting the brakeman cooled off they exchange positions with the conductor going to the head end and the trainman to the van with a nice welt on his chin.

Happy New Year
Copyright Notice: This image ©David J Parker all rights reserved.



Caption: For my 100th RP.ca image and the last for 2020 lets go back to Aug 19th 1984. I'm working as a CP Operator at the temporary train order station Kaministiquia. The wood caboose CP437188 is not just my office, but my accommodation. I worked here for about six weeks on loan from the London Division. The trainorder signal on the roof was operated using two chains and a hook inside the van. Westbounds would get orders here as they had the track gangs out working between Kam and Raith and would crossover here. The double track main was also left hand running which took some getting used to. A lunchbox radio was used to contact the Winnipeg Dispatcher. Once a train was cleared it, the orders were clipped into a wood hoop. The trainorder signal only had two positions red/green so if orders were 19y (Yellow) you would place the signal red and use a yellow flag. On the weekends they Operators were allowed to go to the hotel in Thunder Bay. If the van needed servicing (Stove oil, fresh water tank filled and crapper cleaned out) the signal had to be secured by climbling on the roof, pulling out a large cotter pin and lowering the whole signal and posts onto the roof and then strapping it down. The first time I did this was at night in the rain. I didn't realize it weighed more than I did and it came crashing down and the light came off and went off the roof, luckily it held on by the electric wire and I did not fall off the roof. The accomodations were pretty sparse. Just a caboose mattress for bed (BYO Sleeping bag) and an oil stove (BYO food) and toilet. Luckily the gang cars got parked in the siding across the tracks and I was able to take advantage of the kitchen car and commandeer some hot meals. Here we see an Extra East led by 5937-5924 and two B&O GP40's passing my office. I was able to shoot this as they did not require orders. On the right side you can see my 1976 Chrysler Cordoba that I purchased from Bruce Mercer while I was working in Chatham. That car got totalled a few days after returning to Windsor when I got hit by an impaired delivery truck driver. (No injuries) I also worked at Dyment and Hawk Lake on the Ignace Sub before returning home. One funny story, the temporary trainorder station hours were listed on trainorder given out of Thunder Bay. I believe it was a stat holiday, maybe Labour Day and this Westbound comes flying around the corner (Usually they would slow right down) and I'm standing there, signal red waving the yellow flag in one hand and hoop in the other. Well the front door of the SD40 flies open and the headend trainman just makes it to the steps to snag the hoop which proceeds to whack him in the face. The train is now in full emergency braking and when stopped I see the headend trainman marching hastily towards my van with hoop in hand. "Oh S**t" I make a hasty retreat and lock the door thinking he was pissed at me. Turns out he was mad at the hogger who assumed the office would not be open on a stat. By this time the Conudctor has walked up from the van to see whats going on. After getting the brakeman cooled off they exchange positions with the conductor going to the head end and the trainman to the van with a nice welt on his chin. Happy New Year

Photographer:
David J Parker [111] (more) (contact)
Date: 09/19/1984 (search)
Railway: Canadian Pacific (search)
Reporting Marks: CP5937-CP5924-BO37xx-BO37xx (search)
Train Symbol: Extra 5937 East (search)
Subdivision/SNS: CP Kaministiquia Sub (search)
City/Town: Kaministiquia (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=43839
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Photo ID: 42617

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3 Comments
  1. Awesome.

  2. Great story Dave!

  3. Awesome pic Dave!

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