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Four of CN's five 1500s take a breather at Sudbury, Ontario.  Almost consecutively numbered, 1504 1505 1507 1506, are pictured.  Missing is the 1508. The locomotives are on the west leg of the "Y" at the shop area. The 1500s weighted in at 246,000 pounds while most of the other SW100RS units tipped the scales at 222/223,000 pounds.  The extra weight of these units came in useful handling all the ore and sand traffic that Sudbury once handled.  Nothing in this scene remains.
Copyright Notice: This image ©First954 all rights reserved.



Caption: Four of CN's five 1500s take a breather at Sudbury, Ontario. Almost consecutively numbered, 1504 1505 1507 1506, are pictured. Missing is the 1508. The locomotives are on the west leg of the "Y" at the shop area. The 1500s weighted in at 246,000 pounds while most of the other SW100RS units tipped the scales at 222/223,000 pounds. The extra weight of these units came in useful handling all the ore and sand traffic that Sudbury once handled. Nothing in this scene remains.

Photographer:
First954 [189] (more) (contact)
Date: 10/07/1978 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: CN 1504 (search)
Train Symbol: N/A (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Sudbury Terminal Sub Mile 4.9 (search)
City/Town: Sudbury (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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Photo ID: 44630

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

Full size | Suncalc
Note: Read why maps changed. Suncalc.net for reference only.


4 Comments
  1. Wild, what was this little yard used for?

    It’s still there.. kinda… did it go any further?

  2. Thanks for the comments Steve.

    At on time CN Sudbury had 3 yards. The one you mention as “kinda” existing was/is known as ALGO yard. It’s located about a quarter of a mile to the left of this picture. It consisted two tracks on the south side of the main line (term used rather loosely); one was the ore alley and the other the sand alley. To the north of the main were six tracks. The yard behind the locomotives consisted of a RIP track (the ore car to the right of the engines is on this track) a storage track, the main line, then about 3 or 4 short tracks. The farthest track was a customs hold bond track and a team track. The other tracks were mostly holding cars waiting their turn on the RIP track. Everything in this picture is gone. The “main line” continued for about another mile or so to downtown Sudbury where the Sudbury (as opposed to Sudbury Junction) station was located. The area consisted of freight sheds and team tracks as well as the interchange track with the CP. Yes, CP tracks ran right through downtown!! Some time in the 1960s the city wanted to clean up this area as it had a bad reputation as the red light district of the city. CN pulled out and the area fully redeveloped. In the picture, the tracks end a couple hundred feet beyond the ore car.

    Sudbury traffic was mostly ore, sand, and support freight for INCO at Copper Cliff. Area mines shipped by rail as opposed to today where a 1000 trucks a day tear up the roads in the area.

    At one time back in the 1960/70s, CN rostered about 10 or so SW1200RS units in Sudbury.

  3. Rare view of any kind of life at Algo yard, my last time there in 2013 the remnants of Algo consist of just enough track off the old “mainline” switch to leave cars when “doubling the hill” trying to pull from the hand throw switch at Clarabelle back towards the Bala sub. @First954, do you recall if the old downtown CN Sudbury station was located just before/at the East end of the big trestle? I’ve always felt like it was in the big bend around the Bloor street crossing but never been sure with my seniority date!

  4. @MuskokaMoFo thanks for the comments. No, CN’s downtown Sudbury station was no where near Bloor Street. The area where the station was located has been totally repurposed and currently shows no hints of any railroad characteristics. The old station was located on Borgia Street(spelling??) and that name has been erased from Sudbury’s history. Today the area is full of low rise apartment buildings on Louis Street, a couple of hundred feet from the intersection with Notre Dame Avenue, behind the St. Mary’s Ukrainian Catholic Church.

    The area by Bloor Street that you referenced used to be occupied by a coal and oil distributer.

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