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Thought this one was worth sharing, as it shows at least part of all four signal masts protecting the diamond between the CN N&NW Spur and the CP Beach Branch, just west of Gage Ave N in Hamilton. The case of water on 7071 adds the final Hamilton touch.
Copyright Notice: This image ©James Knott all rights reserved.



Caption: Thought this one was worth sharing, as it shows at least part of all four signal masts protecting the diamond between the CN N&NW Spur and the CP Beach Branch, just west of Gage Ave N in Hamilton. The case of water on 7071 adds the final Hamilton touch.

Photographer:
James Knott [515] (more) (contact)
Date: 05/16/2022 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: CN 7071 (search)
Train Symbol: 1600 Yard Job (search)
Subdivision/SNS: N&NW Spur (search)
City/Town: Hamilton (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=48815
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Photo ID: 47541

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12 Comments
  1. Nice work

  2. Very nice James. Good view of most interesting interlocking signals, haven’t seen that shape anywhere else. Like the colour contrast between red nose 7071 and the dark clouds, and the early morning sun (I presume). Also, an often over looked historical rail crossing, still in service well over a hundred years later. Thanks and well done ! John

  3. Thanks guys.

    John, this was about 8pm or so. They’re light power headed eastbound in the shot. The 7071 is the trailing unit catching some golden rays as the sun was close to setting.

  4. I’m still wondering the age of those signals. they look fairly modern. Given that the belt line was rebuilt in the early to mid 60′s to accomodate major Dofasco expansion (the original belt line would have crossed over around Ottawa St and ended up in Adam’s yard – was once a diamond there (removed in 82)

  5. Masts are relatively new (same with Irondale on the CP side, which I believe we discussed several months ago), but the signal heads themselves are still old to whatever age haha. As to what that age is, I wouldn’t have the slightest clue. I am not much of a signal buff.

  6. For anyone interested, there is a great set of aerial images in the McMaster archives here. Recommend years 1950, 1954, 1964.

    https://library.mcmaster.ca/maps/aerialphotos/index.html

  7. Then I’m going to go with the mid 60′s when the new belt line diversion was built to Adams yard… the masts really do throw it all off though. Not sure why they love those really tall masts in Hamilton.

  8. Yes Jacob that’s where my research has came from. James and I studied these quite a bit when I found them a couple years ago. This and old th&b timetables are a great resource.

  9. Stephen, if I remember correct to a conversation I had with an SOR employee I believe he said those signals went up in the late 80′s. Before that they were semaphores, same with the Irondale diamond control signals.

  10. Unfortunately I am unable to provide comment on the history of this Interlocking as I am not familiar with the location. I do recognize the type of signal equipment mounted on the masts. The two unit (green, red) colour light signal with the square background was manufactured by The Siemens and General Electric Railway Signal Company, London, England. (SGE). The SGE colour light signal was used extensively in the design of the CN CTC signal system throughout Northern Ontario between 1959 and 1962, being utilized on signals which governed movements down the main track or into the siding.

    The bottom “red” light unit is a General Railway Signal (GRS) “marker” light unit.

  11. Thanks Terry!

  12. Neat stuff – thanks Terry

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