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Streetcars, land yachts and pony cars: TTC PCC 4574 (an ex-Cincinnati A9-class built by St. Louis Car in 1947) operates on the King route as it nears the downtown core of Toronto, heading eastbound in traffic along King Street at Duncan Street. Street parking in downtown Toronto was still "in" back in the 70's, even on a main thoroughfare such as King Street. And why not? Everyone needed a place to park their big Detroit land yacht, Mustang or VW beetle.Today, this part of King Street has been turned into a transit priority corridor (two curb lanes removed along King between Bathurst and Jarvis, and no automobile through-traffic) in an effort to improve transit performance and encourage urban friendly usage. That row of Victorian-era storefronts at the southwest corner of King & John in the background (note green roof) miraculously still stands in 2022, amid a swarm of modern hi-rises and office towers.Original photographer unknown, Dan Dell'Unto collection slide.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Unknown, Dan Dell'Unto coll. all rights reserved.



Caption: Streetcars, land yachts and pony cars: TTC PCC 4574 (an ex-Cincinnati A9-class built by St. Louis Car in 1947) operates on the King route as it nears the downtown core of Toronto, heading eastbound in traffic along King Street at Duncan Street. Street parking in downtown Toronto was still "in" back in the 70's, even on a main thoroughfare such as King Street. And why not? Everyone needed a place to park their big Detroit land yacht, Mustang or VW beetle.

Today, this part of King Street has been turned into a transit priority corridor (two curb lanes removed along King between Bathurst and Jarvis, and no automobile through-traffic) in an effort to improve transit performance and encourage urban friendly usage. That row of Victorian-era storefronts at the southwest corner of King & John in the background (note green roof) miraculously still stands in 2022, amid a swarm of modern hi-rises and office towers.

Original photographer unknown, Dan Dell'Unto collection slide.

Photographer:
Unknown, Dan Dell'Unto coll. [774] (more) (contact)
Date: Circa August 1973 (search)
Railway: Toronto Transit Commission (search)
Reporting Marks: TTC 4574 (search)
Train Symbol: King (ebnd to Broadview Stn) (search)
Subdivision/SNS: King St. & Duncan St. (search)
City/Town: Toronto (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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Photo ID: 47594

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

Full size | Suncalc
Note: Read why maps changed. Suncalc.net for reference only.


3 Comments
  1. Yes sir, it very well does survive, hosting an Indian restaurant and a Second Cup. Also a Mexican Restaurant I believe as well. The building in the background used to be the Canada Westinghouse Company, now the King Blue Hotel (with the facade to such still standing). Where the Texaco station is, is now home to TIFF.

    Buildings in the foreground to the left, now host part of Metro Hall. And parking ain’t like this. Lol.

  2. I forgot to point out, it’s been demolished and now is part of Metro Hall.

  3. Farb’s Car Wash was a top-notch drive through for decades.

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