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West portal of Connaught tunnel.  Look closely and you will see someone in the window of the building.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Andy Morin all rights reserved.



Caption: West portal of Connaught tunnel. Look closely and you will see someone in the window of the building.

Photographer:
Andy Morin [81] (more) (contact)
Date: 08/20/1942 (search)
Railway: Canadian Pacific (search)
Reporting Marks: Not Provided
Train Symbol: 3, second section (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Glacier, Mountain (search)
City/Town: Glacier (search)
Province: British Columbia (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=43834
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Photo ID: 42612

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5 Comments
  1. Surely a historic view. Thank you – I wonder what the oil car was for in that siding?

  2. Probably to fuel the generators for the exhaust fans.

  3. Interesting. Thank you

  4. Did Connaught tunnel have doors at the portal (like the Moffat tunnel un US)? How did the air flow keep the tunnel clear.?

  5. I don’t think the Connaught tunnel ever had doors. I guess the fan blows air through a nozzle pointing east to push the fumes through and out the other end.

    When I was with BC Rail starting in 1980, I heard our Azouzetta tunnel in the Pine pass used to have a door but that was for a different purpose. Much ground water leaks into the tunnel and the door was to prevent winter winds from blowing through and making big icicles. I gathered the experiment didn’t work. When we sent a wide load through there, I had to ask the roadmaster if there was enough extra room for the big load.

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