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T. H. & B. extra east at Hamilton Junction on a typical mild and hazy January Sunday afternoon.


Extra east T. H. & B.  #71 (white flags and white markers) enters the “joint track” section from CP Rail's 1.7 mile Hamilton Subdivision after traversing the  T. H. & B. Hamilton Terminals Subdivision.  


Power is typical (destination CP Rail Agincourt): #71 - #403 - #75 ( GP7 – GP9 – GP7 ). 


At one time these trains were named 'Starlight' and 'Kinnear' and N.Y.C. / Penn Central / Conrail power was common.


(perhaps someone more familiar can fill in details).


T.H.& B. became a wholly owned Canadian Pacific Limited subsidiary in 1977 (after this photo)  when Conrail sold their shares to Canadian Pacific Limited (CP Rail division), Conrail originally acquired (1976?) part ownership with the Penn Central bankruptcy. CP allowed T. H. & B. operations to remain independent for some time and as recent as 1985 the T.H.&B. continued dispatching  authority. Operationally, by 1990 the T.H.&B. was no longer and the T.H.& B. Welland Subdivision was renamed the CP Rail Fort Erie Subdivision.


Track at the far right is mile zero of the CP Rail Goderich Subdivision. Track at the immediate right is the 'wye track'  (also referred to as the 'cow path' ) connecting the CN Oakville Subdivision north track to the CN Dundas Subdivision south track at Hamilton Junction West.


January 23, 1977 Kodachrome by S. Danko


[ courtesy A.W. Mooney:  TH&B #71 :The first locomotive ever built { and delivered } by GMD in London after the locomotive division came into existence in 1950 was TH&B's GP 7 #71, and it met an untimely fate at Webber Rd, a few miles west of Welland on Feb. 12, 1980. A loaded semi failed to stop and broadsided the locomotive, knocking it into the ditch. Fuel spills resulted in both the truck and locomotive catching fire. The railroad crew survived but the truck driver perished. This view is from the following morning, as a heavy crane positions itself to assist in the attempt to bring #71 back onto its feet; and later it was taken to Hamilton........and eventually the scrapper.]

 by A.W.Mooney   


More T.H.& B. #71


 at Agincourt   


  westbound   


 the end   


sdfourty
Copyright Notice: This image ©sdfourty all rights reserved.



Caption: T. H. & B. extra east at Hamilton Junction on a typical mild and hazy January Sunday afternoon.

Extra east T. H. & B. #71 (white flags and white markers) enters the “joint track” section from CP Rail's 1.7 mile Hamilton Subdivision after traversing the T. H. & B. Hamilton Terminals Subdivision.

Power is typical (destination CP Rail Agincourt): #71 - #403 - #75 ( GP7 – GP9 – GP7 ).

At one time these trains were named 'Starlight' and 'Kinnear' and N.Y.C. / Penn Central / Conrail power was common.

(perhaps someone more familiar can fill in details).

T.H.& B. became a wholly owned Canadian Pacific Limited subsidiary in 1977 (after this photo) when Conrail sold their shares to Canadian Pacific Limited (CP Rail division), Conrail originally acquired (1976?) part ownership with the Penn Central bankruptcy. CP allowed T. H. & B. operations to remain independent for some time and as recent as 1985 the T.H.&B. continued dispatching authority. Operationally, by 1990 the T.H.&B. was no longer and the T.H.& B. Welland Subdivision was renamed the CP Rail Fort Erie Subdivision.

Track at the far right is mile zero of the CP Rail Goderich Subdivision. Track at the immediate right is the 'wye track' (also referred to as the 'cow path' ) connecting the CN Oakville Subdivision north track to the CN Dundas Subdivision south track at Hamilton Junction West.

January 23, 1977 Kodachrome by S. Danko

[ courtesy A.W. Mooney: TH&B #71 :The first locomotive ever built { and delivered } by GMD in London after the locomotive division came into existence in 1950 was TH&B's GP 7 #71, and it met an untimely fate at Webber Rd, a few miles west of Welland on Feb. 12, 1980. A loaded semi failed to stop and broadsided the locomotive, knocking it into the ditch. Fuel spills resulted in both the truck and locomotive catching fire. The railroad crew survived but the truck driver perished. This view is from the following morning, as a heavy crane positions itself to assist in the attempt to bring #71 back onto its feet; and later it was taken to Hamilton........and eventually the scrapper.]
by A.W.Mooney

More T.H.& B. #71

at Agincourt

westbound

the end

sdfourty

Photographer:
sdfourty [288] (more) (contact)
Date: 01/23/1977 (search)
Railway: Toronto Hamilton and Buffalo (search)
Reporting Marks: T.H.&B. #71 (search)
Train Symbol: extra east T.H.& B. #71 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: CN Oakville Subdivision: Hamilton Jct. (search)
City/Town: Hamilton Jct (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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7 Comments
  1. Thanks. I suppose the difference in my photo will be the fact the hillside is decimated and I am standing 20 to 30 feet behind at a slightly higher elevation.

    Funny enough when I look at the debris on the hillside it’s clear to me the area used infill or was previously a garbage dump. LOTS of broken Heinz bottles (glass) plus much other construction type debris. Some real artifacts to be found.. worth a look for the adventurous.

    Thanks for the note – your glass is still good today, however I must caution, today’s new Digital SLR sensors – 36 megapixels upwards of 50 megapixels require the highest quality glass and even glass made 10 years ago does not resolve properly for the new modern sensors.

    While old lenses work fine on most cameras, the time is quickly coming where this is coming to an end – there will be standard lenses and HD lenses , basically.

    Sensors are now hitting the theoretical limits of optical resolution of glass….

    The old prime lenses are among the best though, the 50mm lenses still do very well for example. The AI-S are even sharper from your era.

  2. sdfourty: I agree 100% with film; I still shoot regularly with film, Mamiya 645 & 400 ISO roll film. As far as your vantage point at Hamilton Jct., well, construction activity has decimated the viewpoint. The hillside has been shaved right down.

  3. Kodachrome taken with a ubiquitous Nikkor 50mm f1.4 lens purchased used with the Nikkormat EL at Toronto Camera. First additional lens purchased was a used Nikkor 135mm f2.8 ( a huge lens ). Shortly after bought a used Nikkor 28mm f2.8. First new lens was a Nikkor 35mm f2.8 purchased 1981. Still have the EL and the 35mm lens – and both are in service today albeit irregularly. To me the digital lens’ today cannot match the quality, ruggedness and heft (substantial-bility?) of the traditional glass – nice that most glass AI Nikkors’ are service-able on Nikon FX and DX digitals.

    Regularly travel with a film Nikon, everyone should remain in touch with film – to be true to our roots as photographers verses image-ists!

    Several years ago tried to scout the Hamilton Jct location, if I recall this area was bushed out. Perhaps cleaned up somewhat today?
    sdfourty

  4. Steve – did you take this with a 35mm lens? I was trying to replicate this today. I have come close. But I can’t stand at the exact same elevation anymore – this “mound” has been levelledand new piles in its place behind it.

  5. Love them TH&B Geeps, and a great angle to boot! I presume it’s all grown in here today?

  6. This photo is also neat for a couple other reasons: Mile 0 due to the start of the South Ontario Pacific Railway (TH&B to Guelph Junction Railway connection, completed 1912)

    Also shows the junction of the CN Codeline.

    Thanks for sharing!

  7. Nice!!! Any images with #71 on the lead I consider special, as no doubt do most TH&B fans. Hard to believe it has been 25 years since the demise of the old Thump Hump & Bump.

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