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Wabash F7A 671 crosses the St. Thomas diamond with the London & Port Stanley Railway, heading eastbound on CN's Chatham-Cayuga Subs in 1967. A selection of vintage automobiles are parked next to the old Wabash/GTR station on the left, and semaphore signals guard the interlocking from movements on the L&PS.This location, known on the timetables as St. Thomas, was the transition point from Mile 0.0 CN Chatham Sub to the west, to Mile 119.0 CN Cayuga Sub to the east, both formerly Grand Trunk lines (that the Wabash had running rights over) and originally built as the Great Western Railway's "Canada Air Line". The L&PS crossed this junction point north-sound at the diamond pictured. They were taken over in 1965 by CN and the line became the CN Talbot Sub and later Talbot Spur (the diamond here was Mile 15.0).For more rail action in St. Thomas:A L&PS passenger excursion at their station: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=13531L&PS passenger train hauling freight:http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=13490A C&O train coming off the connector onto the CASO: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=14920An NYC (PC) rail instection car pays a visit: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=14921Chessie-painted C&O Geeps retired & stored: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=14938
Copyright Notice: This image ©Bill Thomson all rights reserved.



Caption: Wabash F7A 671 crosses the St. Thomas diamond with the London & Port Stanley Railway, heading eastbound on CN's Chatham-Cayuga Subs in 1967. A selection of vintage automobiles are parked next to the old Wabash/GTR station on the left, and semaphore signals guard the interlocking from movements on the L&PS.

This location, known on the timetables as St. Thomas, was the transition point from Mile 0.0 CN Chatham Sub to the west, to Mile 119.0 CN Cayuga Sub to the east, both formerly Grand Trunk lines (that the Wabash had running rights over) and originally built as the Great Western Railway's "Canada Air Line". The L&PS crossed this junction point north-sound at the diamond pictured. They were taken over in 1965 by CN and the line became the CN Talbot Sub and later Talbot Spur (the diamond here was Mile 15.0).

For more rail action in St. Thomas:
A L&PS passenger excursion at their station: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=13531
L&PS passenger train hauling freight:http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=13490
A C&O train coming off the connector onto the CASO: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=14920
An NYC (PC) rail instection car pays a visit: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=14921
Chessie-painted C&O Geeps retired & stored: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=14938

Photographer:
Bill Thomson [476] (more) (contact)
Date: 00/00/1967 (search)
Railway: Wabash (search)
Reporting Marks: WAB 671 (search)
Train Symbol: Not Provided
Subdivision/SNS: St. Thomas - CN Chatham / Cayuga Sub (search)
City/Town: St. Thomas (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=18806
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Photo ID: 17698

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5 Comments
  1. I enjoy these historic pictures.

  2. Host, yes not that far from reality.

  3. Cameron, not that hard to imagine – it may happen in Fort Erie still. :)

  4. Can only imagine if this line was still around today under NS…and 1070 (h/u) was on the point of a manifest.

  5. Classic!

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