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Tourists on the Great Gorge Route get a good close look at the Niagara river. A lot of rock has come down since this photo was taken by my Grandfather in 1928. The line opened in 1895 as the Niagara Falls and Lewiston Railroad, running from Lewiston to the Honeymooner Bridge near the present day Rainbow Bridge. The line was merged and connected in 1902 with the Niagara Falls Park & River Railway line on the Canadian side and became known as the Great Gorge route. Rockfalls and landslides were a constant problem. The line on the Canadian side closed in 1932. A portion of the line is visible north of the botanical gardens and butterfly conservatory. The line on the American side closed in 1935 after a 5000 ton rock slide came down just north of the whirlpool bridge. On the American side a trail runs on the roadbed from the Rainbow Bridge to below the whirlpool bridge. Location approximate, editing by the moderating team.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Eric May all rights reserved.



Caption: Tourists on the Great Gorge Route get a good close look at the Niagara river. A lot of rock has come down since this photo was taken by my Grandfather in 1928. The line opened in 1895 as the Niagara Falls and Lewiston Railroad, running from Lewiston to the Honeymooner Bridge near the present day Rainbow Bridge. The line was merged and connected in 1902 with the Niagara Falls Park & River Railway line on the Canadian side and became known as the Great Gorge route. Rockfalls and landslides were a constant problem. The line on the Canadian side closed in 1932. A portion of the line is visible north of the botanical gardens and butterfly conservatory. The line on the American side closed in 1935 after a 5000 ton rock slide came down just north of the whirlpool bridge. On the American side a trail runs on the roadbed from the Rainbow Bridge to below the whirlpool bridge. Location approximate, editing by the moderating team.

Photographer:
Eric May [116] (more) (contact)
Date: 1928 (search)
Railway: Tourist (search)
Reporting Marks: Not Provided
Train Symbol: Not Provided
Subdivision/SNS: Niagara falls (search)
City/Town: Niagara Falls (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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Photo ID: 27376

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5 Comments
  1. I lived in Lewiston, NY, in the mid 90′s for a few years. It was (is) a very interesting small town in terms of history, architecture and culture. I was delighted to see this very historical photograph. Thanks for posting, Eric!

  2. This photo is from the Canadian side based on other photos in the album. If you view the location in Google maps and tilt the view, the location looks to be about half way between the rail bridges and the whirlpool. traces of the roadbed are visible between the rockfalls. A parallel row of trees north of the botanical gardens is about the only trace of the roadbed on the Canadian side

  3. Now this is a neat rare shot. What are the remains, tracks?

  4. Another thing is this is highly likely to have been taken FROM Canada (the bottom left hand corner I believe is Canadian soil)

    As a result it does meet our rules for Content – but just. I highly suspect what we’re looking at is the American Side of the Great Gorge Railway a few short years before it was shut down for good.

    The Great Gorge Railway did operate in a ‘u’ pattern across a bridge at Queenston/Lewiston and into Canada to the Canadian ‘side’.

  5. Even though many old scenes around Niagara are relatively common, this I find an amazing shot. A real rarity.

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