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Some times even trains need to wait there turn. Train 478 is just about to leave Fort Nelson and begin the 250 mile journey to Fort St John, but first we must stop at the river bridge and wait for highway traffic to clear. I don't think there are too many other operations like this on the CN system.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Matt Watson all rights reserved.



Caption: Some times even trains need to wait there turn. Train 478 is just about to leave Fort Nelson and begin the 250 mile journey to Fort St John, but first we must stop at the river bridge and wait for highway traffic to clear. I don't think there are too many other operations like this on the CN system.

Photographer:
Matt Watson [224] (more) (contact)
Date: 10/21/2010 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: Not Provided
Train Symbol: CN 478 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Fort Nelson Sub (search)
City/Town: Fort Nelson (search)
Province: British Columbia (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=10846
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Photo ID: 9885

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3 Comments
  1. Cool. I read an article in Classic Trains Magazine about a bridge like this in Peace River, Alberta (Northern Alberta Railway). It was at the bottom of two grades, and one evening when a runaway caboose came down grade from the next town/yard , it rolled across the bridge, just missing an automobile. ***ALL this occured around 4 or 5 in the morning.*** Then the caboose rolled back, as there was a grade on both ends of the bridge, rolled across the bridge, and past the depot where the agent jumped on and tied down the brake. It then rolled down hill again, stopping directly in front of the depot. Just after, the switcher from the next town (steam loco I believe) and grabbed it. Apparently the engine shoved a cut of cars into the caboose, whose knuckle was closed, thereby shoving it down the main. All employees kept quiet, but the agent had stopped an auto from crossing the bridge when he (agent) saw the van rolling back. The driver of the auto put an article in the paper. Within two weeks, all were fired.

    If this line is still part of CN (of which it became part of Jan. 1, 1961), it is likely the only other example of this kind of operation.

  2. You bet, trains have to stop, whistle, and make sure there is no vehicle or pedestrian traffic on the bridge, then proceed.

  3. That is so weird! Do cars and trains actually share that bridge?

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