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A follow-up to an image posted about 3 weeks back, Starlite CP 5699 and 5790 waiting for the Dofasco Ore train to pass (and followed by a GO train) before heading out over CN via trackage rights toward Toronto. The ore train power is CN 9550, 9582, 9453, 4006 and 5045. All this action took place around 1700-1800.
Copyright Notice: This image ©A.W.Mooney all rights reserved.



Caption: A follow-up to an image posted about 3 weeks back, Starlite CP 5699 and 5790 waiting for the Dofasco Ore train to pass (and followed by a GO train) before heading out over CN via trackage rights toward Toronto. The ore train power is CN 9550, 9582, 9453, 4006 and 5045. All this action took place around 1700-1800.

Photographer:
A.W.Mooney [1481] (more) (contact)
Date: 09/03/1980 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: CN 9550 (search)
Train Symbol: not recorded (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Hamilton Jct (search)
City/Town: Hamilton (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=27521
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Photo ID: 26364

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

Full size | Suncalc
Note: Read why maps changed. Suncalc.net for reference only.


10 Comments
  1. P.S period. No the ore trains never used the N&NW spur.

  2. You are somewhat correct Stephen about the ore train. Train 730 from up north pulled into the siding at Parkdale from the west switch (and derail) off the Grimbsy Sub. The train could sit for hours waiting for the ok for the “Bayfront” meaning Dofasco. The wye already existed so 730 went into the Bayfront locomotives. The trackage after heading into could be used by CP and locomotives from Dafasco so one had to be very careful as switches could be lined against you. When you got to the bayfront the loads were pulled into an empty track and the caboose was cut “of on the fly” clear of the switch where the empties waited. The train was split in two sections because of a roadway. The power then went on top of the empties and a joint made with the other cut of empties,then the train backed unto the caboose. Air brakes tested and then the train shoved back towards Parkdale. Once again the switches could be lined against the movement, so caution had to be used. The crew would have to call the Hamilton Yardmaster to enter the mainline East switch at Parkdale and once permission was given the crew backed up caboose first onto the Grimbsy Sub and then headed back into Hamilton where orders would be “hooped” up and a register ticket thrown off to the operator at Hamilton. Oh I miss those days.

  3. On the ore train subject, I’m led to believe the wye at Parkdale and the ore train lead were built for these trains, meaning they reversed into Dofasco from Parkdale

    But did these trains ever take the N&NW spur by chance? Curious if anyone knows. That would have been quite the sight..

  4. The UNPX cars used by Inland Cement to transport rock limestone from the Cadomin Mine were not the same as the CN/ONT ore cars. While the top mounted wheeled mast hatch cover opening mechanism was similar, the discharge gates were completely different. I believe the cubic volume was dissimilar as well.

  5. That “speeding freight” sounds like something one could only witness running parallel with the Route 30 in Nebraska in those days. :o )

  6. My best story using those GP40′s is, my favourite hoghead on an express train headed east to Wainwright, went and fiddled with the overspeed trips before leaving Calder yard. On the long piece of straight track east of Tofield we were doing 68-69mph, the fastest I have ever gone on a freight train. Way back in the summer of 1979.

  7. @Extra.. thats all CN used in the 80′s were GP40-2′s. They did not consider then “speed power”. MLW’s were not dependable enough to head north and the SD40′s were mostly based out west.

  8. One of my favorite trains to run. Miss those trains 730/731 :-(

  9. Same cars; wheels on the roof to open and close the doors for loading. It was remarkable how CN would 5 on a 15000 ton ore train and send 3 of the same on 217 to Vancouver the same night. Brilliant shot Arnold.

  10. Are those the ore cars with the little sets of wheels sticking up in the air. We used to get unit trains of those here in Edmonton at Inland Cement. Nice action shot Arnold. Interesting that they have speed power on a heavy pulling train. The GP40-2′s spent a lot of time on express trains in this area (late 70′s and into the 80′s).

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