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Watching for trains coming over the bridge from the USA and thru Niagara Falls back in the 1990s could be hazardous to your health. For one thing, you could get yelled at or run down if you were not careful. The tourist areas were murderous for auto traffic, as well as wayward visitors not knowing they are stepping into your attempted photo.
The ace-in-the-hole was to motor over to the South Siding Switch at the south end of town. Today, this location is good for the odd Chippawa industrial images, as that is all the traffic there was left once the track was torn up thru downtown around 2001.
Good quiet location to pull over and wait for a train was right here. In this view CP 4212, 1865, PNS 3013, and CP 4214 haul Toronto-bound traffic on a warm summer evening; which is when most trains seemed to make an appearance. Either that or after sunset.
Not many PNC (Precision National) units to be seen, but at this time power-short CP was grabbing just about every serviceable unit they could get their hands on. And hope they kept running.
Today, the tower in the background is pretty well buried in the forest of new highrise buildings, hotels, condos, what have you. And the expansion is still on-going. Council last week passed plans for a 72 floor building downtown. In tacky town Niagara Falls, it appears the sky is the limit.
Copyright Notice: This image ©A.W.Mooney all rights reserved.



Caption: Watching for trains coming over the bridge from the USA and thru Niagara Falls back in the 1990s could be hazardous to your health. For one thing, you could get yelled at or run down if you were not careful. The tourist areas were murderous for auto traffic, as well as wayward visitors not knowing they are stepping into your attempted photo.The ace-in-the-hole was to motor over to the South Siding Switch at the south end of town. Today, this location is good for the odd Chippawa industrial images, as that is all the traffic there was left once the track was torn up thru downtown around 2001. Good quiet location to pull over and wait for a train was right here. In this view CP 4212, 1865, PNC 3013, and CP 4214 haul Toronto-bound traffic on a warm summer evening; which is when most trains seemed to make an appearance. Either that or after sunset.Not many PNC (Precision National) units to be seen, but at this time power-short CP was grabbing just about every serviceable unit they could get their hands on. And hope they kept running.Today, the tower in the background is pretty well buried in the forest of new highrise buildings, hotels, condos, what have you. And the expansion is still on-going. Council last week passed plans for a 72 floor building downtown. In tacky town Niagara Falls, it appears the sky is the limit.

Photographer:
A.W.Mooney [1338] (more) (contact)
Date: 08/31/1994 (search)
Railway: Canadian Pacific (search)
Reporting Marks: CP 4212 (search)
Train Symbol: #523 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: CP Hamilton sub. (search)
City/Town: Niagara Falls (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=39494
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Photo ID: 38300

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3 Comments
  1. The Minolta Tower is now a hotel dwarfed by the more recent buildings.
    It must have surprised the summer visitors to see a train running through the town like that.
    I can’t even find any evidence of a railway there now.

  2. Thanks for the buttering up, Marcus. :o )

  3. Fantastic image!

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