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On the charging deck of the Algoma Steel Corporation's Canadian Furnace Division.  The Charging Deck was a double wide track arrangement where hoppers of Coke could discharge directly into bins that were housed below deck level.  It was also used for charging Iron Ore Pellets that likely originated from Algoma Steel properties near Wawa (see the pyramidal mound of iron ore pellets). The iron ore came in by lake ship, but Metallurgical Coke was often railed in by both TH&B and CN.  A nice mixture of CN and CP hoppers in different paint schemes being shuttled around by the GE Center Cab. The view is looking east across the Welland Canal from the foot of Sugarloaf and West Streets. The site is home to ALLIED MARINE today and has no resemblance to it's former use.   Thanks to Stephen H for the help on this one !
Copyright Notice: This image ©Michael Klauck - Harry Whiting Collection all rights reserved.



Caption: On the charging deck of the Algoma Steel Corporation's Canadian Furnace Division. The Charging Deck was a double wide track arrangement where hoppers of Coke could discharge directly into bins that were housed below deck level. It was also used for charging Iron Ore Pellets that likely originated from Algoma Steel properties near Wawa (see the pyramidal mound of iron ore pellets). The iron ore came in by lake ship, but Metallurgical Coke was often railed in by both TH&B and CN. A nice mixture of CN and CP hoppers in different paint schemes being shuttled around by the GE Center Cab. The view is looking east across the Welland Canal from the foot of Sugarloaf and West Streets. The site is home to ALLIED MARINE today and has no resemblance to it's former use. Thanks to Stephen H for the help on this one !

Photographer:
Michael Klauck - Harry Whiting Collection [36] (more) (contact)
Date: 1974 (search)
Railway: Other (search)
Reporting Marks: Not Provided
Train Symbol: Industrial (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Canadian Furnace - Algoma Steel Corp. (search)
City/Town: Port Colborne (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=44721
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Photo ID: 43489

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13 Comments
  1. Oh my

  2. Very neat! Never would have thought it was this large of an operation. That very GE center cab unit could be the one in the Hamilton industrial sector photographed by James Knot in this photo…

    http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=43057

  3. Remarkable photo. I cannot remember any of what is in this photo save for the little switcher.

  4. I had no idea such a large facility once existed in Port Colborne. It’s really neat that one could watch the action from across the canal also. Great photo.

  5. I remember the GE unit well. I think there were siderods on the wheels that were mesmerizing to watch. Great shot. Thanks Michael.

  6. Neat scene.

  7. What is that what looks like a side dump car with a cab above the pile of ore?

    This is fantastic.

  8. Thanks guys, glad you found it interesting. Wilfred Laurier arrived in Port Colborne (by train) in 1904(ish) and promised to make Port Colborne the Buffalo of Canada (a lofty goal since Buffalo at the time was the wealthiest city in America). Some politicians keep their promises and true to his word, between 1905 and 1920 the industrial landscape was radically transformed. The CANADIAN FURNACE COMPANY (after 1950 – Algoma Steel), was one of those installations

  9. This one is for Stephen’s question, on the “side dump car”… first of all… you have got Eagle Eyes, and clearly nothing is getting by you ???? !! Most of the Blast Furnace charge was Iron Ore Pellets, they would come in by lake ship, and then one or two of the huge ORE BRIDGES (think DOFASCO), would use clamshell buckets to charge special purpose “in-house” tapered side hoppers. The units would bottom dump into the bins below charging deck level..you can see more in this photo on the NRM site (incorrectly described as slag dump)… http://www.nfrm.ca/images_galleries/images_misc/full/oredumpwm.jpg

  10. Thank you, that answers it quite nicely. Reminds me of the coke mogul type locomotive found at Dofasco. (Not sure there are any left there)

  11. Homerjay, the Bunge unit was built in 1946 and was not owned by Inco.

    The inco locomotive currently on the property was acquried new by them in 1953, it’s a 45T ballasted to 50. Could be the very same in this picture?

    Note the source on this is the 2014 Canadian Trackside Guide (which is very reliable on unit histories). Of course, it’s 6 year old data now..

  12. Stephen, I know the 2020 Trackside guide says the same thing.

    However when I was trained the manual inside it, as well as our service manual has the serial number and says “Canada Furnace”. Also our unit weighs slightly over 47,000 (47 T). It may have weight closer to 50 with the original motors but they were replaced a few years back.

    Hard to tell if the book is correct since the builders plate is gone and the serial number isnt anywhere on the unit.

  13. All very interesting, thanks for sharing this Homerjay84… one other comment on the special in-house charging hopper, the unit(s) were powered, looks like it was a direct contact bus bar feed to the traction motors, must have been DC. I don’t seem to have any close-up photos of those units when the factory was dismantled

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