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For reasons I never did find out, eastbound VIA train #72 came to an abrupt stop at the Carew diamond (CP) and phone calls were made and a good 10 minutes worth of discussion took place before the train proceeded. All the better for me, camped right there watching for any interesting moves.  This was as good as it got that day. VIA 6557 is x-CP  FP9A 1409, and now resides at the Canadian Museum of Rail Travel in Cranbrook, BC.
Copyright Notice: This image ©A.W.Mooney all rights reserved.



Caption: For reasons I never did find out, eastbound VIA train #72 came to an abrupt stop at the Carew diamond (CP) and phone calls were made and a good 10 minutes worth of discussion took place before the train proceeded. All the better for me, camped right there watching for any interesting moves. This was as good as it got that day. VIA 6557 is x-CP FP9A 1409, and now resides at the Canadian Museum of Rail Travel in Cranbrook, BC.

Photographer:
A.W.Mooney [2016] (more) (contact)
Date: 06/04/1989 (search)
Railway: VIA Rail (search)
Reporting Marks: VIA 6557 (search)
Train Symbol: #72 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: CN Dundas Sub. (search)
City/Town: Woodstock (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
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Photo ID: 48029

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11 Comments
  1. Great pic. Kinda sad that pretty much all those CCF “Blue fleet” cars have all been cut up.

  2. Neat catch. Bit of contrast in their “uniforms.”

    @ngineered4u, the GHRA in Guelph is restoring one of the CCF cars (VIA 3216/CN 5472) back to CN 1961 black and grey.

  3. Thx Jacob, that is awesome news. Before I became an engineer, I was a brakeman/conductor on many passenger trains in Southern Ontario and Quebec. I used to love working in those coaches, lol even when they were acting up. I was lucky enough to save some of the name plates of the sleepers and Club cars before they were scrapped :-)

  4. Come to Guelph and have a tour of ours. You’ll appreciate the details we are restoring. We even have the smoking section dividers :)

  5. Also facinating that the interchange has cars in it.

  6. Would this have been the main interchange to the St. Thomas Sub before the one at Beachville went in?

  7. The one at beachville was always there. it was part of the CP St. Marys sub essentially. (built by the Tillsonburg Lake Erie and Pacific Railway in 1910) A train could go from Ingersoll over across CN (through crossovers) then regain access to the St. Marys sub to run to Zorra, where they’d do something similar across the Galt (having to throw two switches) to run up to St. Marys…

    Considering that the line was in place until 1995 and had service!

    And all those tracks at beachville have been there for Carmeuse Lime (at the time Beachville Lime). They’ve since been repurposed for interchange with OSR.

    What I don’t know is when they stopped using the Woodstock interchange as it would have been very small, maybe 10 cars max, fewer if they are autoracks as pictured.

    When CN operated their own switcher in Ingersoll (1988-2010 or so) they probably used Beachville track as they continue to do now for setoffs/lifts of Beachville traffic (usually set off by 434) but it was not an interchange until OSR took over that switching.

    Another point is Beachville could have been an interchange for CPR traffic from the Ingersoll area back in the day, but that’s going back even further and I know nothing about that. (Not to mention there is a CPR line to the Carmeuse lime yard still in place.. just abandoned)

    St. Thomas was another interchange point where they interchanged with the CNR, Wabash, and NYC/PC/CR to the St. Thomas sub.

    Most of these small interchanges are gone, very few remain. London still retains one… chatham was another one but it’s all shut down now, same with Woodstock.

  8. The train crew may have been stopped by a red light.Rule 564/610 applicable for trains. I see there is a dwarf signal on the ground between the 2nd and 3rd coach. The train is also on the north track if its headed eastbound, which before CTC was fully installed between Paris West and Frauts outside of London would have been considered wrong tracking. 72 would also have had to make its station stop off the north track and would have had to be protected by Rule 107. Sadly, less than a year after this picture was taken I would lose my colleagues Don Blain and Kevin Lihou in the 1999 Thamesville crash :-(

  9. Yes, a sad and horrific crash. Bloody ‘ell.

  10. Following up on this interchange discussion, here is a 1928 fire insurance map of Ingersoll showing the bridge noted in the comments, used by OSR today, but also one further west into a customer near the CP yard.

    https://history.ocl.net/Portals/OxfordCountyLibrary/documents/1928_Ingersoll_insurance_map.pdf?ver=2020-07-09-120425-737

  11. The Ingersoll section of the Tillsonburg Lake Erie and Pacific wasn’t completed until 1910

    http://www.trainweb.org/ontariorailways/railtill.htm

    This begs the question to when the bridge east of town became the main connection.

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