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Norfolk & Western F7A 3658 (one of the Canadian-built former Wabash units) and an unknown N&W GP9 are shown at the head end of a westbound extra stopped at Jarvis station, at Mile 62.7 of CN's Cayuga Sub. Judging by the sun angle, this appears to be a summer evening sunset shot, with a crew member on the track in the distance near the rear of the train.

The N&W had trackage rights over CN between Windsor and Fort Erie from an 1898 agreement by the Wabash Railway, to operate over CN predecessor Grand Trunk Railways's old "Canada Air Line". This was a factor in Wabash, as well as other US roads like the New York Central and Chesapeake & Ohio, ordering Canadian-built diesels from GMD London to dieselize their operations through Southern Ontario. The GTR/CN-Wabash agreement was continued by N&W, and later NS. CN eventually abandoned the Cayuga Sub in 1996 (and the NS trains changed their routing), but Jarvis station remained for other business uses. Photos from other RP.ca contributors show it was recently relocated a number of years ago from its site along the former Cayuga Sub right-of-way.

Original photographer unknown, Dan Dell'Unto collection slide.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Unknown, Dan Dell'Unto coll. all rights reserved.



Caption: Norfolk & Western F7A 3658 (one of the Canadian-built former Wabash units) and an unknown N&W GP9 are shown at the head end of a westbound extra stopped at Jarvis station, at Mile 62.7 of CN's Cayuga Sub. Judging by the sun angle, this appears to be a summer evening sunset shot, with a crew member on the track in the distance near the rear of the train.

The N&W had trackage rights over CN between Windsor and Fort Erie from an 1898 agreement by the Wabash Railway, to operate over CN predecessor Grand Trunk Railways's old "Canada Air Line". This was a factor in Wabash, as well as other US roads like the New York Central and Chesapeake & Ohio, ordering Canadian-built diesels from GMD London to dieselize their operations through Southern Ontario. The GTR/CN-Wabash agreement was continued by N&W, and later NS. CN eventually abandoned the Cayuga Sub in 1996 (and the NS trains changed their routing), but Jarvis station remained for other business uses. Photos from other RP.ca contributors show it was recently relocated a number of years ago from its site along the former Cayuga Sub right-of-way.

Original photographer unknown, Dan Dell'Unto collection slide.

Photographer:
Unknown, Dan Dell'Unto coll. [561] (more) (contact)
Date: Circa August 1975 (search)
Railway: Norfolk and Western (search)
Reporting Marks: N&W 3658 (search)
Train Symbol: Not Provided
Subdivision/SNS: Jarvis Station - CN Cayuga Sub (search)
City/Town: Jarvis (search)
Province: Ontario (search)
Share Link: http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=38599
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Photo ID: 37406

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

Full size | Suncalc
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8 Comments
  1. Almost “shockingly nice” for a film image back then.

  2. What a great photo. Thanks for posting! My Dad was the CN Roadmaster in Jarvis from 1969 to 1985. His office was in the former waiting room area of the station (behind the windows under the Jarvis sign). When we moved to Jarvis in 1969 there was an Operator position at the Jarvis station. When the Hagersville Sub. was rerouted to cross highway 6 north of the hamlet of Garnet and connect with the Nanticoke Spur via a new railway crossing at grade with the Cayuga Sub. at CN Garnet, the operator was relocated there. At that time the section foreman and his crew moved into the operators area and used it as an office and lunch room until their positions were abolished and the Cayuga Sub. was abandoned, The signal maintainer worked out of the shanty immediately east of the station. I started my CN career as a section man at Jarvis in October of 1971 before transferring to the Work Equipment department at Danforth Shops in Scarborough, ON in the spring of 1972. My Mom had a weekly contract with CN to clean the lunchroom and offices until 1985. Lots of work and personal memories in this shot.

  3. Beautiful image! Such a shame only a Tim Hortons sits at this location today :(

  4. mercer: I was thinking that initially, but the sill above the fuel tank matches a later phase GP9 and not GP7 3453. I’ve seen a few shots of US-built N&W GP9′s operating with the F’s in their later years, so figured it’s probably one of those.

  5. Although I don’t remember all the details, this territory was a “joint section” and the two companies had to “agree” to revised charges—funny how N&W/NS never was quite satisfied with adjustments which CN was proposing…(In the early 1990s, my department had to research radio circuits and maintenance charges involved in dispatching and provide them to the Joint Facilities Accounting department.) Other CN lines, such as the Oakville sub, were also joint sections where costs were shared or apportioned by usage.

  6. ” in film days” it was, Shoot It and then throw it away later, or, just don’t shoot it at all.
    Looks like someone decided to shoot it and kept it, knowing the F7′s were dwindling fast ( 3658 was retired by Feb1976).
    The trailing geep is probably the 3453 but it’s hard to tell due to the angle etc. It does not have dynamic brakes.

  7. Also on the Wabash/CNR agreement – the President of the Grand Trunk was former President of the Wabash, hence the friendly agreement, which handcuffed CNR for many decades as they seem to have been unable to get out of the agreement – NS had to want out! And out they wanted in 2006..

  8. This is most excellent. I wonder who the photographer was? It’s not often you see low light photography at night in the film days – considered artsy at the time.

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