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Passing Carleton, Mileage 40.9 of the Borden Subdivision, CN's Train 115 was just eight minutes away from the ferry dock at Borden, Prince Edward Island, on Saturday, October 12, 1968.  No one had set the flag, so the trio of RSC-13s motored by with a baggage car and combine at 912 a.m.  The abbreviated train had left Charlottetown, the provincial capital, at 730 for the 42.4-mile run.  I had chased the same train in May of 1968, and it had then included a full coach, rpo and three express baggage cars as well as a steam generator.   In both cases, the cars were transferred to the S.S. Prince Edward Island and off-loaded at Cape Tormentine, on the New Brunswick shore.  From there, the train continued its 6-hour run to Moncton.   I had wanted a shot at Carleton as I had graduated from the similarly named university in Ottawa in May 1967.  

Leading RSC-13 1733 was one of 35 similar MR10 units on CN.  They had arrived from MLW beginning in mid-1955 as a uniquely Canadian unit.  Their A1A trucks made them suitable for CN's many branchlines.  Tested from coast to coast, they settled in Southwestern Ontario until the mid-1960s.  With CN's determination to retire their 1200hp CLC roadswitchers, the MR10s found new life in the Maritime Provinces.  Several came to Prince Edward Island and promptly bumped a pair of H12-44s from the mainline passenger trains and 70 Ton GE's from many secondary routes, excluding those south of Mount Stewart, east of Charlottetown.   By the mid-1970s, their 6-cylinder McIntosh and Seymour inline 1,000hp engines were out of favor on CN.  So, they were retired, and their trucks placed under de-rated and lightened RS-18s in a program conducted by the Moncton Shops.  For example, 1733 was retired on Wednesday, October 8, 1975, and its trucks installed under RS-18 3845, which became RSC-18 1752 when it re-entered service on Friday, October 24, 1975.   CN assigned 1750 through 1756 to Charlottetown in 1979.   On Wednesday, August 25, 1993, CN sold the unit for scrap to Met-Recy in Laval, Quebec.  It was resold to the Deleware-Lackawanna but was subsequently rejected and presumed scrapped.
Copyright Notice: This image ©Bill Linley all rights reserved.



Caption: Passing Carleton, Mileage 40.9 of the Borden Subdivision, CN's Train 115 was just eight minutes away from the ferry dock at Borden, Prince Edward Island, on Saturday, October 12, 1968. No one had set the flag, so the trio of RSC-13s motored by with a baggage car and combine at 912 a.m. The abbreviated train had left Charlottetown, the provincial capital, at 730 for the 42.4-mile run. I had chased the same train in May of 1968, and it had then included a full coach, rpo and three express baggage cars as well as a steam generator. In both cases, the cars were transferred to the S.S. Prince Edward Island and off-loaded at Cape Tormentine, on the New Brunswick shore. From there, the train continued its 6-hour run to Moncton. I had wanted a shot at Carleton as I had graduated from the similarly named university in Ottawa in May 1967.

Leading RSC-13 1733 was one of 35 similar MR10 units on CN. They had arrived from MLW beginning in mid-1955 as a uniquely Canadian unit. Their A1A trucks made them suitable for CN's many branchlines. Tested from coast to coast, they settled in Southwestern Ontario until the mid-1960s. With CN's determination to retire their 1200hp CLC roadswitchers, the MR10s found new life in the Maritime Provinces. Several came to Prince Edward Island and promptly bumped a pair of H12-44s from the mainline passenger trains and 70 Ton GE's from many secondary routes, excluding those south of Mount Stewart, east of Charlottetown. By the mid-1970s, their 6-cylinder McIntosh and Seymour inline 1,000hp engines were out of favor on CN. So, they were retired, and their trucks placed under de-rated and lightened RS-18s in a program conducted by the Moncton Shops. For example, 1733 was retired on Wednesday, October 8, 1975, and its trucks installed under RS-18 3845, which became RSC-18 1752 when it re-entered service on Friday, October 24, 1975. CN assigned 1750 through 1756 to Charlottetown in 1979. On Wednesday, August 25, 1993, CN sold the unit for scrap to Met-Recy in Laval, Quebec. It was resold to the Deleware-Lackawanna but was subsequently rejected and presumed scrapped.

Photographer:
Bill Linley [54] (more) (contact)
Date: 10/12/1968 (search)
Railway: Canadian National (search)
Reporting Marks: CN 1733 (search)
Train Symbol: 115 (search)
Subdivision/SNS: Mileage 40.9 Borden Sub (search)
City/Town: Carleton (search)
Province: Prince Edward Island (search)
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Photo ID: 39788

Map courtesy of Open Street Map

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4 Comments
  1. Great shot Bill, just days after your 1968 trip to Newfoundland to chase the ‘Caribou’. I believe this PEI shot now means that you have at least one image from every Canadian Province! Way to go! – Ken

  2. Yes, we were on our way home. We even found time the day before to tour the Cabot Trail. We covered a lot in those ten days. I think we were all home in Ottawa and Toronto by Sunday evening.

  3. My Gawd, Bill…THAT is one for the ages. Love it!!!!

  4. Much appreciated. I’ve now logged at least coast-to-coast. So glad I accepted the challenge to post each weekday during the ‘quarantine.’

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